On Site Restaurant – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 23:05:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hotels-benin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png On Site Restaurant – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ 32 32 Inflation hits the fast food counter https://hotels-benin.com/inflation-hits-the-fast-food-counter/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 23:05:32 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/inflation-hits-the-fast-food-counter/ On a cold Tuesday afternoon this month, James Marsh stopped by a Chipotle near his suburban Chicago home to grab something to eat. It had been a while since Mr Marsh had been to Chipotle – he estimated he went five times a year – and he stopped short when he saw the prices. “I […]]]>

On a cold Tuesday afternoon this month, James Marsh stopped by a Chipotle near his suburban Chicago home to grab something to eat.

It had been a while since Mr Marsh had been to Chipotle – he estimated he went five times a year – and he stopped short when he saw the prices.

“I had my usual, steak burrito, which was maybe in the mid-$8 range,” said Marsh, who trades stock options at his home in Hinsdale, Illinois. “Now it was over $9.”

He went out.

“I thought I would find something at home,” he says.

The pandemic has led to price spikes in everything from slices of pizza in Manhattan to sides of beef in Colorado. And that has led to more expensive items on the menus of fast-food chains, traditionally establishments where people are used to grabbing a quick bite that doesn’t hurt their wallet.

At a Chipotle in Costa Mesa, Calif., the price of a chicken burrito — nothing fancy, hold the guacamole — about a year ago was $7.25. These days, that same burrito costs around $7.95, according to price data gathered by analysts. In Ann Arbor, Michigan, a ShackBurger at Shake Shack cost $5.69; now it’s $6.09. And in Oklahoma City, an order of 50 bone-in wings from Wingstop that cost $41.99 at the start of last year is now $47.49, an increase of 13%.

Last year, the price of fast food menu items rose 8%, its biggest rise in more than 20 years, according to government data. And, in some cases, the portions have gone down.

“In recent years, most fast food restaurants may have increased their prices by the single digits every year,” said Matthew Goodman, an analyst at M Science, an alternative data research and analytics firm. “What we’ve seen over the last six-plus months is restaurants putting pressure on prices.”

This comes at a time when the hypercompetitive fast food market is booming.

Chains like McDonald’s, Chipotle and Wingstop have been big winners from the pandemic as consumers, stuck at home and tired of cooking multiple meals for their families, have increasingly turned to them for convenient solutions. But over the past year, as the cost of ingredients rose and the average hourly wage rose 16% to $16.10 in November from a year earlier, according to government data, restaurants have began to quietly increase their prices.

But charging customers more for a burger or burrito is a delicate art. For many restaurants, this involves complex algorithms and test markets. They need to strike a balance between raising prices enough to cover expenses and not scaring off customers. Also, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Chains operated by franchisees generally allow individual owners to decide prices. And national chains, like Chipotle and Shake Shack, charge different prices in different parts of the country.

When Carrols Restaurant Group, which operates more than 1,000 Burger Kings, raised prices in the second half of last year, customer numbers actually improved from the third to fourth quarters. “Over time, we generally haven’t seen a lot of consumer pushback” on the higher prices, Carrols chief executive Daniel T. Accordino told analysts at a conference in early January.

Menu prices are expected to continue to climb this year. Many restaurants say they are still paying higher wages to attract employees and expect food prices to rise.

“We expect unprecedented increases in our food basket costs relative to 2021,” Ritch Allison, chief executive of Domino’s Pizza, told Wall Street analysts at a conference this month. While Domino’s hasn’t raised its prices, it is changing its promotions — offering the $7.99 pizza deal only to customers ordering online and reducing the number of chicken wings in some promotions to eight-for-10 — in order to maintain profit margins.

Despite higher food and labor costs, some restaurants are seeing sales and profits rebound beyond pre-pandemic levels.

When McDonald’s reports earnings this month, Wall Street analysts expect its revenue to have hit a five-year high of more than $23 billion, an increase of $2 billion from 2019. Net income is expected to reach $7 billion, up from $6 billion in 2019. Other chains like Cracker Barrel and Darden Restaurants, which own Olive Garden and Longhorn Steakhouse, have resumed paying dividends or stock buybacks in cash after suspending these activities at the start of the pandemic to conserve cash.

And next month, when Chipotle reports 2021 results, analysts expect revenue to top $7.5 billion, a 34% jump from 2019. Net income is expected to nearly double from at pre-pandemic levels. In the third quarter, the company repurchased nearly $100 million of its stock. Chipotle declined to make an executive available for an interview, citing the quiet period before its earnings release.

As Chipotle executives blamed higher labor costs for a 4% increase in menu item prices this summer, the company was looking for ways to increase profitability.

One way was to charge higher prices for delivery. Delivery orders through providers like DoorDash and Uber Eats have skyrocketed for Chipotle and other fast-food chains during the pandemic. But the same goes for the commission fees that Chipotle paid to sellers. So in the fall of 2020, it began running tests to see what would happen if it raised the prices of burritos, guacamole and chips that customers ordered for delivery, executives told Wall analysts. Street during an earnings call. This basically meant that the customer covered Chipotle’s side of the delivery charges.

The company found that customers were willing to pay for the convenience of delivery. Now customers who order Chipotle for delivery pay about 21% more than if they ordered and picked up the food from stores, according to analysis by Gordon Haskett Research Advisors analyst Jeff Farmer.

“I would say our ultimate goal, so that would be long-term, maybe medium-term, is to fully protect our margins,” Chipotle chief financial officer Jack Hartung said in a call with analysts at Chipotle. Wall Street. falls. “When you compare our prices to other restaurant companies for quality of food, quantity of food, quality and convenience of experience, we offer great value. So we think we have room to fully protect the margin.

That doesn’t mean customers are thrilled with the added costs.

This month, Jacob Herlin, a data scientist in Lakewood, Colorado, placed an order: a steak and guacamole burrito for $11.95, a Coca-Cola for $3, and fries and guacamole, which were free with a birthday coupon. The total was $14.95, before taxes.

But when he clicked to have the food delivered, the price of the burrito soared to $14.45 and the soda to $3.65, bringing the total to $18.10 before taxes, 21% more than before. he had picked up the food himself.

There was more. Mr. Herlin was charged a delivery charge of $1 and an additional “service charge” of $2.32, bringing the total meal delivered to $23.20. He tipped the driver an additional $3.

Mr Herlin said he didn’t mind paying for the delivery and wanted the drivers to be paid a living wage. But he said Chipotle wasn’t upfront with customers about the additional costs.

“They basically hide the fee in two different ways, via this base price increase and via the hidden ‘service fee,'” Mr. Herlin said in an email. “I would much rather if they had the same price and were just honest about the $5 delivery charge.”

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The next great American restaurants are in the suburbs. But can they thrive there? https://hotels-benin.com/the-next-great-american-restaurants-are-in-the-suburbs-but-can-they-thrive-there/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 06:13:12 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/the-next-great-american-restaurants-are-in-the-suburbs-but-can-they-thrive-there/ Megan Curren, 35, owner of Graceful Ordinary, a fine dining restaurant in St. Charles, Illinois, said while many Chicago restaurants are still hurting financially due to the pandemic, St. Charles is recovering faster. Spaces like hers have plenty of room for outdoor dining, she said, and people are moving into the area — not out […]]]>

Megan Curren, 35, owner of Graceful Ordinary, a fine dining restaurant in St. Charles, Illinois, said while many Chicago restaurants are still hurting financially due to the pandemic, St. Charles is recovering faster. Spaces like hers have plenty of room for outdoor dining, she said, and people are moving into the area — not out of it.

Yet this seemingly symbiotic relationship between restaurants and diners has its complications.

As suburbs welcome more diverse businesses that enrich the community, this success may attract the attention of developers, said Willow Lung-Amam, associate professor of urban studies and planning at the University of Maryland. The resulting developments can drive up costs, forcing out the same contractors who helped make the area more attractive in the first place.

Mikey Ochoa opened his Latin restaurant, Oculto, in Castro Valley, Calif., last December. But he can’t afford to live nearby. In Castro Valley, he said, “the price of a one-bedroom apartment is higher than my two-bedroom apartment” in Hayward, just three miles away.

Mr. Ochoa, 31, added that Castro Valley is not well equipped for an influx of restaurants. Many spaces for rent don’t have refrigeration, fume hoods or grease traps, he said, and building a restaurant there could end up costing more than in town. He opened Oculto at Castro Valley Marketplace, a food hall where he was able to negotiate an affordable lease.

The design of some suburbs makes it even more difficult for independent restaurateurs to succeed.

While not all suburbs are alike, in general, suburban planners are unsure how to best support independent restaurants, said Dr. Samina Raja, a professor of urban planning at the University at Buffalo. Because they don’t understand that these businesses often have a shorter financial trail than larger restaurant groups or chains, planners are less likely to award economic development grants or relax zoning restrictions.

Restaurant owners must also navigate many local government departments, including health, planning and zoning, which may not be as well prepared to meet the needs of independent owners as cities.

“I haven’t come across suburbs that do a great job of streamlining the process,” Dr. Raja said.

Dr. Lung-Amam, Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, said many suburbs lack public transit and aren’t zoned for mixed-use development, so homes and businesses can’t exist in the same area. Restaurants therefore have few nearby residents who do not have to go there to eat.

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New York Minster Refectory restaurant reveals ‘local, seasonal food’ will be central to menu https://hotels-benin.com/new-york-minster-refectory-restaurant-reveals-local-seasonal-food-will-be-central-to-menu/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 07:22:14 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/new-york-minster-refectory-restaurant-reveals-local-seasonal-food-will-be-central-to-menu/ Ms Toppin and her partner Will Pearce have already set up a successful business in their Bishopthorpe Road, Robinsons Cafe, which aims to provide affordable services Register to our Business newsletter Register to our Business newsletter The same qualities are set to define the cathedral’s new refectory-style café-restaurant accessible to all, due to open later […]]]>

Ms Toppin and her partner Will Pearce have already set up a successful business in their Bishopthorpe Road, Robinsons Cafe, which aims to provide affordable services

Register to our Business newsletter

Register to our Business newsletter

The same qualities are set to define the cathedral’s new refectory-style café-restaurant accessible to all, due to open later this year.

Bex Toppin and Will Pearce.

Ms Toppin said: ‘Food in the Minster Refectory restaurant will be sourced locally as much as possible.

Read more

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The historic Yorkshire town hall has finally been sold after being bought by a mysterious buyer…

“The idea is simple: let all the high-quality ingredients shine through, without fuss. If the ingredients are good, you don’t need to do the same with the food.”

“We really want to continue to focus on local, good quality and seasonal dishes at the Refectory Restaurant,” she added.

The main ground floor lobby restaurant is expected to have a capacity of over 60 seats with breakfast and lunch options and evening menus; and smaller private reception rooms and dining rooms upstairs.

“Upstairs has stunning views of the cathedral which will be amazing for special occasions,” Ms Toppin said.

A spokesperson said: “Bex, who is originally from Darlington, started as a trainee chef in 2007 at Raymond Blanc’s two-star Michelin, Oxfordshire Le Manoir aux Quat’Saison.

“She worked for two years under Chef Kerry Atkinson at Rockcliffe Hall, Co. Durham, where she met Will, who was running past the house.

“They moved to the Channel Islands together, working with head chef Saun Rankin in Ormer Jersey, where, with Bex in the kitchen and Will as assistant restaurant manager, they achieved a Michelin star after just four months. eventually decided to open their own in the North, and after working at Yorebridge House in the Yorkshire Dales, they launched Robinsons in York in 2016.”

The Refectory restaurant development team also includes The Star Group of Restaurants, GEM Construction (York) Ltd. and Rachel McLane Ltd.

A spokesperson said: ‘Plans for the new Refectory restaurant remain subject to final planning clearance under a ‘subject to contract’ agreement as York Minster, Gem Construction and The Star Group of Companies work in partnership to finalize contractual agreements.

“This follows the unanimous resolution of York City Council’s Planning Committee to grant planning permission for a new dining hall restaurant on the site of the former Minster School.”

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A dilemma for restaurants and workers in New York: what to do with Omicron? https://hotels-benin.com/a-dilemma-for-restaurants-and-workers-in-new-york-what-to-do-with-omicron/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 17:43:52 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/a-dilemma-for-restaurants-and-workers-in-new-york-what-to-do-with-omicron/ After Nikolas Vegenas, a bartender at Apotheke in Chinatown and Bar Meridian in Brooklyn, tested positive for the virus in mid-December, he tried to apply for unemployment benefits by phone and online. The website “was super complicated,” he said. “I called them and waited on the phone, and they said I didn’t qualify.” Asked if […]]]>

After Nikolas Vegenas, a bartender at Apotheke in Chinatown and Bar Meridian in Brooklyn, tested positive for the virus in mid-December, he tried to apply for unemployment benefits by phone and online. The website “was super complicated,” he said. “I called them and waited on the phone, and they said I didn’t qualify.”

Asked if restaurant workers who test positive for the virus are eligible for unemployment, a New York State spokesperson said, “Unemployment determinations are made on a case-by-case basis, but Restaurant workers are eligible for unemployment under the same standards as every other worker.

But Ms Jayaraman noted that the state’s unemployment eligibility requirements include being “ready, willing and able” to work, according to the New York Department of Labor website, and clarified that “you cannot file for a week when you work more than 30 hours or earn more than $504 in gross pay between Monday and Sunday.” This would make it difficult for anyone isolated for only about a week to qualify as “able” to work, or to even deem it worth applying, she said.

Getting information on unemployment benefits and best practices for restaurants can be a challenge. A New York Times reporter who reached out to city and state officials to clarify their health guidelines was directed back and forth between multiple departments for two days, and several specific questions went unanswered.

Olivia Sternberg, a waitress at Crocodile, a French bistro in Williamsburg, tested positive shortly before Christmas, and the restaurant granted her two weeks of paid sick leave. Managers and owners checked in on her regularly, she said, to see how she was doing.

Feeling supported by her employer has relieved her, but she still has concerns: will customers want to dine indoors during a new wave, in the middle of winter? Will vaccination requirements change, and if they do, how will customers react?

“Here we go again,” she said.

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5 restaurant openings we’re looking forward to in 2022 | Restaurants | Hudson Valley https://hotels-benin.com/5-restaurant-openings-were-looking-forward-to-in-2022-restaurants-hudson-valley/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:20:42 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/5-restaurant-openings-were-looking-forward-to-in-2022-restaurants-hudson-valley/ Click to enlarge East-West, one of the food stalls at the future Academy Food Hall in Poughkeepsie, will serve Asian dishes like bao buns, ramen and dumplings. In January, instead of making promises about what kind of diets or exercise programs we’re going to follow in the coming year, we make resolutions about what future […]]]>

Click to enlarge

  • East-West, one of the food stalls at the future Academy Food Hall in Poughkeepsie, will serve Asian dishes like bao buns, ramen and dumplings.

In January, instead of making promises about what kind of diets or exercise programs we’re going to follow in the coming year, we make resolutions about what future dinner dates we plan to take. themselves. It’s not just about us and all the delicious things we’ll eat. It is a matter of hope. It’s been two years since we last did our roundup of planned restaurant openings. COVID closures, licensing delays, business bottlenecks and supply chain shortages have conspired to prevent, discourage or delay new restaurant openings over the past two years, but we hope that in 2022, things will get back on track. Here are five Hudson Valley restaurant openings we’re looking forward to in 2022.

The aviary and the nest | Kinderhook

In the January issue, we featured artist Darren Waterston and Chef Yen Ngo’s ambitious plans for the Kinderhook Knitting Mill. The project includes three buildings, three restaurants, four apartments and several small shops, including a wine shop, a garden center and a gallery. The Morningbird Cafe and Cafe has already opened its doors to the public and offers casual Southeast Asian comfort food for breakfast and lunch. The other two dining concepts are a 150-seat upscale restaurant called The Aviary and a lounge bar called The Nest, which will also focus on Dutch-Indonesian cuisine and are slated to open this spring. “The Aviary is going to be more overtly Dutch-Indonesian, seen through a modern Hudson Valley lens,” says creative director Nic Der. “The Nest will have small bites like fried smelt or scotch quail eggs wrapped in sausage and deep fried.”

The Academy | Poughkeepsie

The $13 million The Academy project, which began in 2020, is a highly anticipated mixed-use building that will combine hospitality with retail, coworking and residential spaces. In addition to the 28 affordable apartments and 8,700 square foot event space, Keepsake, which will occupy the upper levels, the ground floor will feature a robust food hall. For informal meals, there will be four food stalls. Valley Greens makes custom salads and cereal bowls. Smoke 33 will specialize in slow smoked meats and sides. East-West will feature Asian-inspired street food like bao rolls, ramen, and dumplings. And Hudson Hopworks will bring together the region’s craft beers under one tap and bottle shop. For a more formal dining experience, head to the full-service Academy Kitchen & Bar, run by Chef Rachael Potts. At the front of the Academy’s food hall there will also be a cafe serving ready-made coffee and a Poughkeepsie outpost for Michael Kelly’s beloved bakery, the Newburgh Flour Shop. The whole kit and caboodle should open at the end of April.

Krupa Bros Pierogi Co. | kingston

Krupa Bros. Pierogi Co. (KBPC) was started by twins Kyle and Tyler Krupa in October 2020 as a small batch wholesale business selling to independent grocery stores and specialty markets in the Hudson Valley and Berkshires. The brothers, who started helping their Polish grandmother handcraft pierogies at age 9, produced in the kitchen at Ray’s Place in Oakville, CT. But they are preparing to open a location on West Strand Street in the Rondout area of ​​Kingston in March. “We will be geared towards the production and distribution of our gourmet pierogi, with some retail freezer doors for on-site purchases,” says Kyle Krupa. “We won’t be doing food service initially as we’ll be establishing in a new location, but we’re very excited to get into fairs and farmers’ markets.” Krupa Bros. wholesales six varieties of pierogi, all made with real mashed potatoes. Flavors range from classic farmhouse cheese to gourmet roasted garlic and black truffle oil to broccoli cheddar. On site, they also sell retail specialties like buffalo chicken with gorgonzola and; potato, jalapeño, bacon and cheddar.

Restaurant Kitty | Hudson

Under the direction of Anna Morris and Chef Lauren Schaefer, Kitty’s Market Cafe in Hudson quickly became known throughout the Valley for its “turning” chicken (essentially perfectly seasoned rotisserie-style chicken), simple side dishes and comfort food and sammies for breakfast. From the start, Kitty’s master plan included a full-service restaurant in the space next to the market (plus a natural wine store, Grapefruit, which is open). Due to COVID delays, the dream has been postponed several times, but after a long wait, Kitty’s sit-down restaurant is scheduled to open in late spring 2022. “We are currently recruiting for the position of Culinary Director, and although we were planning to open in May, if we’ve learned anything from the pandemic it’s that things don’t always go to plan,” staff responded in an email. While the Culinary Director will of course set the specific direction of the food program, the restaurant will stick to the farm-to-table market and coffee philosophy, sourcing meat and produce from suppliers. local. Since Grapefruit focuses exclusively on natural wines, we think it’s a safe bet that Kitty’s restaurant wine list will include low-intervention and farmer-made wines, as well as local spirits, craft beer and ciders.

First bloom!? | Bloomville

In a December New Yorker article, chef, cookbook author and culinary personality Alison Roman confirmed the rumor that she had purchased a rambling old Victorian in the upstate town of Bloomville. The ground floor previously housed Table on Ten, a beloved farm-to-table pizzeria, while the upper floor had been rented out as bed and breakfast. Roman plans to turn the retail space, which came with an industrial-grade coffee machine and a wood-burning oven, into a small food market. She also talked about the tantalizing possibility of hosting pop-up dinner parties in the dining room after the makeover. Roman didn’t respond to requests for comment, but if you know his recipes, you’ll join us in dreaming of an upstate outpost for hearty, complex, yet accessible staples like pasta. with caramelized shallot and curly green beans, mushrooms, and onions.

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New Restaurant and Dining Room Planned for Fulton Area in Wheeling | News, Sports, Jobs https://hotels-benin.com/new-restaurant-and-dining-room-planned-for-fulton-area-in-wheeling-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:22:01 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/new-restaurant-and-dining-room-planned-for-fulton-area-in-wheeling-news-sports-jobs/ Photo of Eric Ayres – Dave Runkle adjusts a sign placed atop the rubble that was recently Mace’s living room on Fulton Street in Wheeling. Runkle plans to construct a new building that will house a restaurant and lounge with a small dining room that will be called Holidaze. The Wheeling Planning Commission this week […]]]>

Photo of Eric Ayres – Dave Runkle adjusts a sign placed atop the rubble that was recently Mace’s living room on Fulton Street in Wheeling. Runkle plans to construct a new building that will house a restaurant and lounge with a small dining room that will be called Holidaze.

The Wheeling Planning Commission this week granted site plan approval for a new facility at 205 Fulton Street this spring.

Local business owner Dave Runkle and landowner Dave Shriver appeared before the Planning Commission for a review of the site plan for the Fulton Street property. The site was previously occupied by Mace’s Parlor / Hani’s Restaurant & Lounge.

Shriver noted that his late uncle, Ben Dobkin, told him that if Hani Shami ever sold Fulton Restaurant, he would have to buy it. That’s what he did. Since then, Runkle and Shriver have worked on creating a new restaurant on the site, and Runkle’s daughter Miah, a graduate of Linsly School and West Liberty University, has honed her hospitality and hospitality skills. expertise in cold cuts. with Holidaze Traiteur.

Runkle said the passion Miah puts into her restaurant business will drive the new restaurant, which they hope to open in April if all goes well.

So far, the company has received the green light from the Wheeling City Council Planning and Development Committee, which recently approved an application to redevelop the site.

The Wheeling Board of Zoning Appeals also approved waivers to allow them to construct the building to the property lines. Officials said landowners and neighboring business owners who came to speak at a public hearing on the proposal before the Zoning Appeal Board have all come out in favor of the company.

“What we want to do is create a restaurant with a small dining room that can seat up to 50 people and around 40 to 50 seats in the restaurant,” Runkle said. “It will be a steel building with a cathedral-type ceiling to be more open.

The building that housed Mace’s was demolished last fall, and Runkle said he hoped to start construction on a new, taller 5,000-square-foot building soon. There is already a parking lot adjacent to the property, and employees will be able to park nearby on a vacant lot next to the national road.

Since the property is located near Wheeling Creek and in the floodplain, it will be raised higher than street level. It will be four blocks high with stone along the base, a wooden frame with a steel exterior cladding.

The developer has already received approval for the video lottery and alcohol sales.

A number of facilities and equipment that will be used for Holidaze were purchased after the closure of Hardee’s in Wheeling and Applebee’s in the Highlands, Runkle noted.

Holidaze will have an outdoor patio, games room, bar, small dining room and indoor restaurant dining area. They should be open from 7:00 a.m. for breakfast, until lunch and dinner until 9:30 p.m. on weekdays and around 11:30 p.m. on weekends.

Homemade salted bacon, specialty roast chicken and other signature items will be among the featured menu selections. Runkle himself had operated a number of local eateries and eateries in the Ohio Valley, including Miah’s at the Day’s Inn in St. Clairsville, Route 40 Wings & Things in Elm Grove, and Michael’s Steakhouse & Lounge in Wheeling.

“His roast chicken is to die for,” said Shriver.

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Why you can’t trust restaurant reviews https://hotels-benin.com/why-you-cant-trust-restaurant-reviews/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/why-you-cant-trust-restaurant-reviews/ This article originally appeared on VICE Italy. It’s Friday night. You want to go out for dinner somewhere cool but you’re sick of your favorite places, or maybe you’re new to town or passing through on a trip and you have no one to ask for a recommendation. In short, your only options are to […]]]>

This article originally appeared on VICE Italy.

It’s Friday night. You want to go out for dinner somewhere cool but you’re sick of your favorite places, or maybe you’re new to town or passing through on a trip and you have no one to ask for a recommendation. In short, your only options are to just go the old-fashioned way and walk into a place that looks good from the outside or search for restaurants online and peruse reviews to see if they’ll be. good.

The problem is, platforms like TripAdvisor and Yelp – which were sort of invented for this type of situation – are full of fake reviews. Additionally, people are much more likely to leave a review when they’ve had a bad experience, which skews the overall restaurant rating and turns many review sections into a very entertaining dumpster fire. This can be disastrous, especially for small businesses that have just opened – a 2020 study found that an early bad review can turn customers away in the long run, and that review platforms actually have an inherent bias. towards popular restaurants.

The only other alternative, it seems, is to read food articles and blogs and hope to land on an honest review. But if you’ve ever ventured into the tangled world of food criticism, you’ll know these things can be hit and miss. Sometimes a new place will get stellar reviews only to disappoint once you get there.

Food is by definition a matter of taste, and different people appreciate different aspects of a restaurant experience – the decor, the ambiance, the price, the surprise factor – but, according to Slovenian food and travel blogger Kaja Sajovic, there is actually more story.

“We all know food journalists aren’t paid enough to cover the cost of a restaurant dinner, so press trips have become a necessity to do our job,” Sajovic says. “And that creates a lot of ethical dilemmas. Can you really give a bad review of a restaurant you’ve been invited to, with flights and hotels covered? I think it’s difficult, and maybe even a little unfair.

Of course, Sajovic talks mostly about freelancers and food bloggers. Journalists who receive a stable salary and their expenses covered may be much freer when writing their review, but they are certainly the exception rather than the rule in the industry.

Culinary writer Paola Miglio, publisher of the Peruvian website El Trinche [Spanish for “The Carving”], says she has always made a point of being uncompromising with her opinions. “If I don’t like something, I say so. And I write it down, even when I’ve been invited [to the restaurant], says Miglio. “In my three years as a food critic in a newspaper, I’ve only been bullied a handful of times by a restaurateur or chef on social media. I never felt the pressure to rent anything or anyone.

For many other culinary authors, things aren’t that simple. Some choose to build their audiences on sarcasm – think British food critic Jay Rayner and his book Wasted calories and wasted nights, once described as creating a “bloodthirsty sport by destroying culinary reputations”. It certainly fits the stereotype of a food critic. In reality, writers like Rayner are an exception in an industry plagued by festive hyperbole and easy enthusiasm.

“There are few chefs who respond well and kindly to criticism,” says food journalist Gabriele Zanatta, who writes for the Italian web magazine. Golose Identity (“Greedy identities”). Zanatta believes it’s because cooks historically have been mostly hidden figures. Only with France news culinary movement of the 1960s, which revolutionized international cuisine, as chefs rose to fame and “even achieved celebrity status over the past two decades,” says Zanatta. “No wonder they are intolerant of criticism! They had never been on such a pedestal. “

However, Zanatta also believes that this chef-centric approach to culinary writing is slowly fading away. “We’re now paying more attention not just to food, but to all the other aspects that make a restaurant a restaurant,” he says. In his experience, chefs today are more willing to listen, provided that the reviews they receive are not just a pretext for a food critic to flaunt his knowledge and opinions.

To avoid this, Zanatta says he tends to “give his reviews in private.” This is how many food writers tend to work: public praise and private criticism. But for Chiara Cavalleris, editor-in-chief of the Italian culinary news site Dissaporates (“Disgust”), this too is a problem. “The industry is plagued by press dinners which are inevitably followed by positive reviews,” she said. The resulting reviews are positive – except in very rare cases – with food editors trying to squeeze in the review without shaking the boat too much.

“Obviously, overwhelmingly positive or totally negative reviews work well on social media – they add color,” Cavalleris continues. But choosing not to praise a restaurant in an article can also cost you traffic to your site. “It’s not their duty to share [the piece on social media], but I’ve noticed that if they don’t get a very high rating or a flood of compliments, they never do.

Cavalleris said one of the most disturbing food press boot-licking incidents she’s encountered happened when her site posted a negative review of Osteria Francescana, a three-Michelin-starred restaurant based in the city ​​of Modena, in the north of the country, owned by famous chef Massimo Bottura. “The review dared to touch an idol, Massimo Bottura, a man who can never be questioned,” she says. “Immediately after its release, two different newspapers ran two positive articles to try and fix things.”

Cavalleris believes food journalists are not to blame for the state of affairs, but the food press in general. She believes the media are guilty of colluding with restaurateurs, an issue that has also been raised in a scandal involving the three-Michelin-starred Florentine restaurant Enoteca Pinchiorri. In October 2021, 77-year-old owner Giorgio Pinchiorri was sentenced to four months in prison for harassing a former employee, lifting the veil on his restaurant’s toxic work culture. No traditional food press in Italy has mentioned it.

Having personally met many chefs in a more or less professional capacity, I could not help but notice how many of them would really benefit from genuinely engaging with journalists in the sector.

I spoke about it with Matteo Fronduti, chef of Manna, a restaurant in Milan. He thinks chefs shouldn’t take reviews so personally because there’s no point seeking mass approval if you truly believe your kitchen is a work of art. “If you are truly avant-garde, why bother with the thoughts of an ordinary person who by definition cannot understand the avant-garde? he asks.

Fronduti’s argument may be a little pretentious, but he is also, in a way, right. Last September, the New York Times posted a scathing review of Swiss chef Daniel Humm’s all-vegan tasting menu, which he presented at Eleven Madison Park, his New York restaurant. The reviewer accused the three-Michelin-starred restaurant of jumping on the sustainability bandwagon while continuing to serve meat in private dining rooms for its most lavish patrons.

Hmmm is one of the world’s most famous chefs and could have sent his scathing response to the world’s major food media. But he did not do it. Instead, he continues to charge € 300 per person for his dining experience, even though the NYT the reviewer said one of his dishes tasted like wood varnish. So much for misunderstood visionaries.

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In-N-Out bought this National City creperie. The family business is now looking east https://hotels-benin.com/in-n-out-bought-this-national-city-creperie-the-family-business-is-now-looking-east/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 14:00:30 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/in-n-out-bought-this-national-city-creperie-the-family-business-is-now-looking-east/ South County siblings Jim Spezzano and Linda Spezzano Parra still remember the hearty, homemade pancakes their father made for them after dinner in the late 1950s. “My mom was a fantastic cook and we had these fantastic dinners but then my dad would go into the kitchen around 8pm and start making pancakes which was […]]]>

South County siblings Jim Spezzano and Linda Spezzano Parra still remember the hearty, homemade pancakes their father made for them after dinner in the late 1950s.

“My mom was a fantastic cook and we had these fantastic dinners but then my dad would go into the kitchen around 8pm and start making pancakes which was so crazy because we were all already full. But that was his deal, ”Parra said.

It was this tradition that led to their family business, Family House of Pancakes, which opened its first location on Broadway in Chula Vista in 1964 and a second on East Plaza Boulevard in National City in 2006. The Siblings, along with with the help of their families, run the restaurants since 1972.

The two diners, known for their generous breakfast portions with that home-style feel, have become staples in their communities.

The family plans to open a new location on Broadway in Lemon Grove this year, but it won’t be their third location.

Last Sunday, customers said goodbye to the National City restaurant. The 1.27 acre property, which the Spezzano family leased, sold to In-N-Out Burger last year.

“There’s no way we can fight In-N-Out. (The property) sold for millions. So we were stuck with what happened. It’s not a wonderful thing, but we have to adapt, ”Parra said.

Family House of Pancakes co-owner Linda Spezzano Parra sees customers leave the National City site on January 5, 2022.

(Tammy Murga / The San Diego Union-Tribune)

In an emailed statement Tuesday, officials at the popular burger chain confirmed plans to open a new restaurant on the property and, if approved by the city, construction could take around six to seven months.

The city is currently evaluating a traffic study for the In-N-Out app, which features a drive-through restaurant. The results of the study “will determine whether further consideration is needed for environmental clearance,” said David Welch, an associate planner, adding that after clearance the project would require a public hearing before the Planning Commission.

If approved, the East Plaza Boulevard location would become In-N-Out’s second restaurant in National City. He would also join two others the chain is planning to open in San Diego.

While the fast food business is generally well received in new neighborhoods, news of a new business replacing Family House of Pancakes has saddened many longtime employees and customers.

Brenda Osborne worked in the East Plaza Boulevard building for 36 years, first when it was Jimmy’s Family restaurant, then when Family House of Pancakes moved in.

“I will really miss it. It’s like a family; everyone is close. We all get along, ”she said. “I’ve been there for a very long time and I think it’ll hit me when the building collapses.”

On Wednesday, Spezzano and Parra occupied with other employees clearing the large kitchen and its multiple dining rooms, which were not only used for eating but also for local community meetings, Parra said.

As they were packing, they saw a dozen customers walk towards the closed front door and read the sign announcing the restaurant’s indefinite closure.

“That’s what’s sad because a lot of people come in and start to cry,” said Spezanno as he saw several cars turn around and exit the parking lot.

“A lot of our customers were crying on Sunday – our last day,” Parra added. “I was trying to stay upbeat and positive and it was difficult. They even brought me flowers.

Hundreds of customers have taken to social media to show their support, with many saying they will follow the family to Lemon Grove.

“I’m really shocked… But I’ll follow where your business is going (because) our family loves and appreciates the service we get with Family House of Pancakes, plus it’s like family,” Mechelle Whelan said in a comment. Facebook on the restaurant page. .

“It’s a victory for me. Much closer to home, ”said Rodney Seaman, referring to the upcoming Lemon Grove location.

Parra said the plan was to move the National City restaurant and open it in East County, keeping the same family spirit. Of its more than 45 employees, “all want to come back” to work, she added.

Parra said the family is hopeful that they will be able to adjust to the relocation as well. The family-owned business will be set up by February in a slightly smaller building inside a shopping center on Broadway near Washington Street in Lemon Grove.

Customers can follow Family House of Pancake’s social media updates, Parra said.


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Garlic fails restaurant inspection – The Newnan Times-Herald https://hotels-benin.com/garlic-fails-restaurant-inspection-the-newnan-times-herald/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 21:49:13 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/garlic-fails-restaurant-inspection-the-newnan-times-herald/ Jeffrey Cullen-Dean / The Newnan Times-Herald Garlic Thai Cuisine and Sushi Bar fails its recent sanitary inspection. Garlic Thai Cuisine and Sushi Bar failed its Jan. 4 sanitary inspection with a score of 60. The restaurant is located at 16 N. Court Square. A follow-up inspection will take place 10 working days after the inspection […]]]>

Jeffrey Cullen-Dean / The Newnan Times-Herald

Garlic Thai Cuisine and Sushi Bar fails its recent sanitary inspection.

Garlic Thai Cuisine and Sushi Bar failed its Jan. 4 sanitary inspection with a score of 60.

The restaurant is located at 16 N. Court Square.

A follow-up inspection will take place 10 working days after the inspection failure.

Chai Choomuang, the owner of the restaurant, said he was not worried about the re-inspection and that the establishment would improve its score.

The poor score is due to bad timing and mistakes made by new employees after a busy weekend, Choomuang said.

“We will get there. Everything will be fine,” he said of the upcoming re-inspection. “I’ve already spoken with (the employees). This week we’re going to be having a lot of meetings.”

According to an inspection report of catering establishments from the Ministry of Public Health, Garlic committed several repeated infractions, which lowered the restaurant’s score.

The restaurant did not have an employee health policy, a copy of which was reportedly given to the restaurant upon inspection by the inspector. Employee drinks, jackets and backpacks were poorly stored near food preparation areas, warehouses and coolers.

Loose floor tiles in the kitchen, unsealed raw wood shelves, a hole in the ceiling, a partially falling ceiling vent and a damaged wall in the women’s restroom peeled off during the restaurant inspection.

Many new infractions were noted by the inspector. According to the report, the restaurant did not have a procedure for cleaning up bodily fluids and paper towels were not found at the hand washing sink. Raw shrimp, raw chicken and shelled eggs were stored improperly in the kitchen cooler.

No consumer advisories were found on the new menus and no time stamps were found on the sushi rice.

Some infractions, such as shell eggs tempered to 55 F sitting on a counter, fish found thawing in a sink without hot running water, and the restaurant’s buckets of disinfectant with a concentration below the minimum concentration. corrected on site during the inspection.

The restaurant’s previous inspection report was also not in an easily visible location.

Garlic’s previous two scores were 71 on January 27, 2021, and 70 on June 30, 2021.


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Boulder Eatery Dining Tent Becomes Disaster Relief Site | Colorado News https://hotels-benin.com/boulder-eatery-dining-tent-becomes-disaster-relief-site-colorado-news/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 18:52:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/boulder-eatery-dining-tent-becomes-disaster-relief-site-colorado-news/ By COLLEEN SLEVIN, Associated Press BOULDER, Colo. (AP) – After losing her home and everything it contained in a wildfire that destroyed her entire neighborhood, Abby McClelland wanted to buy clothes for her 4-year-old daughter. Picking up a large Ikea grocery bag on Tuesday, she walked around a tent that normally serves as an outdoor […]]]>

By COLLEEN SLEVIN, Associated Press

BOULDER, Colo. (AP) – After losing her home and everything it contained in a wildfire that destroyed her entire neighborhood, Abby McClelland wanted to buy clothes for her 4-year-old daughter.

Picking up a large Ikea grocery bag on Tuesday, she walked around a tent that normally serves as an outdoor dining area at Hosea Rosenberg’s Blackbelly Restaurant in Boulder, its tables lined with neat piles of sweaters, hats, shirts and napkins. .

There were also boxes of diapers, toiletries and coat racks containing coats. Music from singer Sade was played through speakers as McClelland and her husband filled the bag under the tent’s glittering chandelier. Huge coolers held food cooked by the restaurant’s chefs.

The Rescue Center is one of many places that have sprung up to help people who lost their homes when last week’s wildfire ravaged parts of the nearby towns of Superior and Louisville.

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Rosenberg closed his restaurant over the New Years weekend to give his employees a break and decided to remain closed to host the donation center in the restaurant’s parking lot tent to give back to a community that supported him in difficult times.

He said his efforts were in part in response to the generosity he received at the start of the pandemic in March 2020, when people rallied to donate and raise funds for research after his daughter 2 year old was diagnosed with a rare genetic condition just as restaurants were forced to close.

“It was really heartwarming to see how much people cared and wanted to help,” Rosenberg said.

This week, Boulder’s Mikki Salvetti stopped by the Blackbelly tent with a laundry basket full of clothes to donate to fire victims and to offer to volunteer after seeing a post about the center on social media .

As Salvetti can work remotely and has no children, she was also considering moving to live with her mother in Pittsburgh so that a family who lost their home could move into their home temporarily.

“It’s just to do something like that,” she said.

With more snow on the way, McClelland mainly came to get a coat for his daughter so that she could play outside, build snowmen and throw snowballs and “go on living a life.”

Dressed in clothes she hastily purchased from Target, McClelland said it was always difficult to convince herself that she needed to replace all of her possessions.

She and her family were not at home when the fire broke out and she was not allowed to return to her home in the Sagamore neighborhood of Superior, which was destroyed by the blaze. Not being able to see the destruction makes her loss unreal, she said.

“I have a feeling that we are in an airport and our luggage got lost and that I will be coming home very soon and all my things will be there,” she said.

McClelland has said she doesn’t want to make big decisions right now, like whether or not she and her husband will rebuild their house.

She also said she couldn’t imagine being comfortable in an area where everything, including the trees, had burned down and the community she knew was gone.

But McClelland said she couldn’t imagine not living again where her daughter learned to walk and cycle.

“Leaving all of this behind seems unthinkable,” she said.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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