On Site Restaurant – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 03:16:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hotels-benin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png On Site Restaurant – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ 32 32 One of my favorite restaurants, Taqueria La Chona, gets a second location! https://hotels-benin.com/one-of-my-favorite-restaurants-taqueria-la-chona-gets-a-second-location/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 19:46:37 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/one-of-my-favorite-restaurants-taqueria-la-chona-gets-a-second-location/ One of my favorite restaurants in Wichita gets a second location! On my last visit to Taqueria La Chonai was told they are planning to expand southwest to Wichita later this year. The Mexican Restaurant, located at 3415 E Harry St. has been part of our rotation since opening in 2020. Specializing in cuisine native […]]]>

One of my favorite restaurants in Wichita gets a second location! On my last visit to Taqueria La Chonai was told they are planning to expand southwest to Wichita later this year.

The Mexican Restaurant, located at 3415 E Harry St. has been part of our rotation since opening in 2020. Specializing in cuisine native to Jalisco, Mexico, I’ve stopped there several times for a dish called Carne en su Jugo . If you’ve never eaten it, the dish is extremely popular in Jalisco, Mexico. Carne en su Jugo translates to “meat in its juice”. It is a concentrated and savory broth of finely diced beef served with beans and a wide range of side dishes. Few places serve it, so Taqueria La Chona is a must stop for me.

When I picked it up I was talking to the employees and it seems the plan is to open their second restaurant dubbed, Fonda La Chona, hopefully by November. The new restaurant will be at 1210 W. Pawnee in the space of the former Jimmy Egg, which closed earlier this year. The second store allows them to expand their menu and offer more alcoholic beverages than beer.

This is great news for diners who have had enough of the same Mexican cuisine, as the owners of Taqueria La Chona are sure to bring something different to the table in terms of flavor.

United States car shop

Until Fonda La Chona opens, be sure to check out their flagship location. More information below:

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3415 E Harry St.
Wichita, Kansas 67218
316-651-0050

Monday – Thursday: 11 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday – Saturday: 11 a.m. – 11 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.

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Cash/cards accepted
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Here is their menu:

Good meal,
Tourbillon

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Why Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse refuses to deliver https://hotels-benin.com/why-olive-garden-longhorn-steakhouse-refuses-to-deliver/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 19:59:05 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/why-olive-garden-longhorn-steakhouse-refuses-to-deliver/ While the majority of restaurants have turned to delivery options to boost their profits, there are still a few holdouts. Darden (NYSE: DRI), the parent company of banners like Olive Garden and Longhorn Steakhouse, is one of them. The full-service restaurant mogul told investors this week on its first-quarter 2023 earnings call that its decision […]]]>

While the majority of restaurants have turned to delivery options to boost their profits, there are still a few holdouts.

Darden (NYSE: DRI), the parent company of banners like Olive Garden and Longhorn Steakhouse, is one of them. The full-service restaurant mogul told investors this week on its first-quarter 2023 earnings call that its decision not to offer delivery has shielded it from a negative impact on margins.

“With the margins being basically the same for us off-site versus on-site, because we don’t have those delivery costs, we’re OK everywhere [the on-premise/off-premise mix] is,” said Rick Cardenas, President and CEO of Darden.

Cardenas conceded that some of the company’s brands are still seeing less on-site traffic than before COVID-19. But he said that reduction was offset by an increase in take-out sales. For the quarter, takeout sales — primarily takeout and dine-in orders — accounted for just under a quarter (24%) of total sales at Olive Garden and 14% at Longhorn Steakhouse.

“Two quarters in a row now, we’re seeing consistent offsite levels,” said Rajesh Vennam, senior vice president, chief financial officer and treasurer of Darden.

Since Darden brands do not offer any form of delivery, they are not susceptible to fluctuations in delivery demand which can hurt margins. These fluctuations can be more volatile than demand for takeout, which is generally a cheaper option and is better protected from factors such as inflation that dampen consumer spending.


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But compare the sales mix of Darden brands to those of other big-name restaurant brands, and you’ll see parent company Olive Garden and Longhorn Steakhouse stand in stark contrast to the industry as a whole.

A 2020 report from the National Restaurant Association found that 71% of operators saw an increase in offsite sales as a share of total sales following the COVID-19 outbreak. A 2022 report echoed those findings – 80% of operators said they expected offsite sales volume to stay the same or increase in 2022.

Consumer data confirms this sentiment. The same report found that more than half (54%) of adults surveyed consider buying takeout or delivery “essential to their lifestyle.” And research from Pymnts found that 43% of the more than 2,600 U.S. respondents order food from same-day delivery apps like Uber Eats or DoorDash each month. More than half of them order once a week.

Meanwhile, a 2022 survey from Technomic found that 64% of food ordered from American restaurants in 2021 was either takeout (43%) or delivery (21%). This means that only 36% of orders are made on site. By foregoing delivery, Darden taps into the smaller of the two markets – on-site orders account for around 80% of total orders for some brands.

Why, then, has Darden refused to expand its offsite sales mix through delivery? Comments from company executives suggest the company is concerned about the unit economics of small deliveries.

“At this time, we have no interest in delivering a $10 meal…to an individual household,” Gene Lee, the former CEO of Darden, said in a 2018 earnings call. It’s just not a business we think we want to get involved in right now.”


Watch: No signs of slowing in food price inflation


The company’s position has not changed with the new management. A year ago, when asked if the company was reconsidering its resistance to delivery offers, a Darden executive answered with a simple “no.”

It was reported in 2020 that Darden had experimented with a delivery option, but he still found the economics worrying.

“We tested by doing our own delivery [but] found it really ineffective,” Lee said. “We really haven’t seen third-party delivery grow faster than our own takeout business. We do not plan to launch a third-party delivery model. »

This takeaway business works a little differently than most third-party food delivery apps. For Olive Garden, this calls for a minimum basket size of $75, which was reduced to $50 during the pandemic.

Cardenas thinks these orders are more reliable than third-party deliverers, who add a delivery surcharge that he says will scare off some customers.

“If the consumer starts to feel more cash-strapped, will they be willing to pay the kind of prices they have to pay to have food delivered?” he asked in June. “Or will they just decide to go get it?”

Soon we’ll see if Cardenas is right to be skeptical. With rising inflation, third-party delivery volumes could take a hit, so upcoming earnings reports from companies like Uber, DoorDash and Grubhub will be worth watching.

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This robot named Flippy makes fries for Jack in the Box. https://hotels-benin.com/this-robot-named-flippy-makes-fries-for-jack-in-the-box/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 22:38:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/this-robot-named-flippy-makes-fries-for-jack-in-the-box/ There’s only one catch: it’s a robot. A Jack in the Box in Chula Vista, Calif. launched the fry-making robot in late July, the Washington Post reports. Flippy is trained to dip baskets of food into hot oil and remove them when perfectly browned. It uses artificial intelligence to detect food and transfer it when […]]]>

There’s only one catch: it’s a robot.

A Jack in the Box in Chula Vista, Calif. launched the fry-making robot in late July, the Washington Post reports. Flippy is trained to dip baskets of food into hot oil and remove them when perfectly browned. It uses artificial intelligence to detect food and transfer it when ready to cook or serve.

The robot cost $50 million to develop, $5,000 to deploy in the kitchen, and $3,500 a month to rent. Flippy is a major investment from its maker, Miso Robotics. The company has also developed Sippy, a robot that can pour and seal drink orders before serving them to customers. And don’t forget Chippy, who you may see at a number of Chipotles, frying tortilla chips, the Job reported.

Jack in the Box did not return immediately The wealth request for comment.

Some restaurants have already used robots in their kitchens. A restaurant in Florida has started using Servi, a robot that transports food from the kitchen to customer tables, during the pandemic. And restaurant chain Chili’s started using “Rita the Robot” in 2020 to serve customers, and expanded its use to 51 locations.

The difference now is that fast food restaurants across the country face an ongoing labor shortage as they struggle to recruit and retain workers. About 2.8 million restaurant workers were laid off or furloughed in the aftermath of the pandemic. When business started to get busier, companies found it harder to attract employees with the same salary. The industry still had 750,000 fewer jobs than pre-pandemic levels in May, according to the National Restaurant Association.

The United States has nearly 200,000 fast food outlets across the country. Serving customer flows is increasingly looking like an uphill battle for restaurants. The US Customer Satisfaction Index noted a decline in customer experience from 2021 to 2022 which it attributed to food/beverage quality and speed of service, among others. If service is poor, this in turn can lead to lower tips for servers, affecting their overall income.

Although robots do not have the needs of regular employees, they are not free from problems and can break down without warning. And it’s unclear whether fast-food chains like Jack in the Box will invest heavily in converting their workforce from humans to robots. The Post reports that Jack in the Box plans to install a Flippy in five to 10 more locations by the end of next year.

A 2021 report from Lightspeed, a commerce platform, found that half of restaurant owners plan to use automated technology in the next few years. But about a third of restaurateurs don’t want to see a machine prepare their food, according to an April report from industry news site Restaurant Dive.

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The Green House vegan restaurant in Wilmington has a head horticulturist https://hotels-benin.com/the-green-house-vegan-restaurant-in-wilmington-has-a-head-horticulturist/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:05:49 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/the-green-house-vegan-restaurant-in-wilmington-has-a-head-horticulturist/ When the Green House Restaurant opened over a year ago, plans were already in place to include an actual greenhouse on the property. Now that vision is a reality. In an area next to their space at 1427 Military Cutoff Road, diners can now see a series of white cylindrical towers that grow 11 varieties […]]]>

When the Green House Restaurant opened over a year ago, plans were already in place to include an actual greenhouse on the property. Now that vision is a reality.

In an area next to their space at 1427 Military Cutoff Road, diners can now see a series of white cylindrical towers that grow 11 varieties of lettuce, 35 different herbs, as well as spinach, kale, cucumbers, tomatoes , peppers and eggplant. for the rest.

The Green House also has a senior horticulturist in Michelle Lyon-Heatherly, who tends to the plants and harvests them when they are ready.

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“I’ve been growing things for almost 25 years,” she says. “There are so many farm-to-table restaurants, but it’s very literal here.”

And, as more people become interested in local food and plant-based eating, she thinks restaurants with on-site gardens will also be a growing trend. As it stands, there are now only four other restaurants in the country using the same tower gardening system. Lyon-Heatherly and her husband trained at one, Hamilton Farms in St. Louis.

Michelle Lyon-Heatherly, head horticulturist at The Green House restaurant in Wilmington, North Carolina, discusses the new on-site greenhouse.  ALLISON BALLARD/STARNEWS

At The Green House, she helps choose what to plant, along with chef Parker Lewin and other staff. Next, she uses organic seeds from quality sources.

“Because really, it all starts there,” she said.

Then, these vertical gardens circulate water and nutrients through the center. It is a system that requires less space and water to grow plants.

There’s still a bit of work to do in the restaurant’s greenhouse, including adding more light sources for the plants, but it’s going well. So Lyon-Heatherly plans to teach a few tower gardening classes and learn where your food comes from in the coming months. (Chef Lewin also has classes on the Green House calendar.)

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junya ishigami complete cavernous house and restaurant in yamaguchi https://hotels-benin.com/junya-ishigami-complete-cavernous-house-and-restaurant-in-yamaguchi/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 15:13:19 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/junya-ishigami-complete-cavernous-house-and-restaurant-in-yamaguchi/ learn from the land Junya Ishigami and his team celebrate the completion of ‘Accommodation & Restaurant‘ in the Japanese Yamaguchi City. The sculptural work of the architecture suggests a naturally eroded relief, reminiscent of the tunnels and rocky vaults of underground caves, and expressing the familiar quality of roughness found in nature. In many ways, […]]]>

learn from the land

Junya Ishigami and his team celebrate the completion of ‘Accommodation & Restaurant‘ in the Japanese Yamaguchi City. The sculptural work of the architecture suggests a naturally eroded relief, reminiscent of the tunnels and rocky vaults of underground caves, and expressing the familiar quality of roughness found in nature.

In many ways, these organic features can be seen throughout the architect’s work – with the charred wood canopy that tops its Kokage-Gumo Pavilionand with the waves earthwork who shapes his Art Biotop Water Garden. In Thailand, he introduced a Rainbow rug, whose fine brick veil is pierced by a series of large sculpted openings. One of the most experimental Japanese architects of his generation, his poetic visions often seemed too radical to achieve, making these completed projects all the more fantastical.

At the end of the house and restaurant in Yamaguchi, Junya Ishigami, who received the golden madonna trophy from Milano THE 2021-22 DESIGN AWARD, shares with designboom a detailed account of the design process.
all images © Junya.Ishigami+Associates, except where noted | header © Yashiro Photo Office

raw and organic: the excavations of junya ishigami

This latest project by Junya Ishigami for a French restaurateur now presents itself as a harmonious blend of a refined restaurant and a welcoming family home. The raw surfaces of the excavated space reflect the authenticity of the kitchen – this dialogue was truly intentional, even as the unusual construction process led to new discoveries.

The architect develops: The project is a residence/restaurant for a French restaurateur. He’s an old friend of mine, and he’s the one who ordered Tables for a Restaurant. I was asked to design a building as “heavy” as possible. “I want an architecture whose heaviness would increase over time,” he says. “It can’t be artificially smooth, but rather something with the roughness of nature. Authentic kitchens demand such a place.’

He also told me that “it must give the impression that he has been there and will continue to be there the longest”. His idea was to create a whole new, long-established restaurant.’

junya ishigami house restaurant

a welcoming space to eat and live

Junya Ishigami describes the programmatic balance between home and restaurant, according to the client’s wishes: ‘He longed for something that was both a home and a restaurant, something he could pass on to his children and grandchildren. Now he invites guests to the restaurant like he would invite friends to his home, and with someone special he would let them into the living room or even spend the night.’

When the restaurant is closed, the room serves as a place to stay for the family or study for the children. The plan is laid out with the restaurant to the north and the residence to the south. To go back and forth between spaces, they can cross any of the three courtyards that separate them.’

junya ishigami house restaurant3D data was generated from a mass model, then the mold was hollowed out manually

dig up the inverted landscape

Although the end result of Junya Ishigami’s home and restaurant appears like a natural cave, the process of sculpting and constructing the space was methodical – with many moments of exploration. The result is an inverted landscape, sculpted in part by nature.

Describing the construction of the project, the architect writes: ‘In terms of construction, we designed a process of constantly sharing, accepting and referencing the inaccuracies and accidents that occurred on site to create an architecture that internalizes natural distortions and uncertainties..

Specifically, we dug a hole in the ground to pour concrete, hollowed out the volume and attached glasses to create an interior space.’

junya ishigami house restaurant
the team dug a hole in the ground to pour concrete, hollowed out the volume and attached glass to create an interior space

The precise design

First, a mass model that had undergone countless modifications was converted into 3D data. The 3D coordinate data was then entered into a Total Station (TS) survey instrument to determine the points using a pile driving navigation system.. At the same time, construction workers dug the hole manually for precision while constantly confirming position and shape on an iPad. Unexpected factors such as grass growth, ground collapse or errors due to manual work have been tolerated as much as possible.’

“When the structure was excavated after the concrete solidified, it was covered in mud. With the range of geology, the nature and appearance of the soil differed from place to place. We originally planned to remove the dirt to reveal a gray concrete structure. However, we were impressed with how it looked with the floor which we decided to leave as is. It was then that we felt the atmosphere of a cave and decided to redesign the building with a new image.’

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Beverly Hills Courier – Planning approves French restaurant Dior on Rodeo Dr. — Beverly Hills Courier https://hotels-benin.com/beverly-hills-courier-planning-approves-french-restaurant-dior-on-rodeo-dr-beverly-hills-courier/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 00:21:25 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/beverly-hills-courier-planning-approves-french-restaurant-dior-on-rodeo-dr-beverly-hills-courier/ BY Matthew Blake September 15, 2022 Reading time: 3 minutes The city of Beverly Hills has given the green light to a three-story Christian Dior building on North Rodeo Drive with a new ride for the famous fashion brand – a rooftop restaurant intended to woo celebrities. The Beverly Hills Planning Commission on September 8 […]]]>

BY Matthew Blake September 15, 2022

Reading time: 3 minutes

The city of Beverly Hills has given the green light to a three-story Christian Dior building on North Rodeo Drive with a new ride for the famous fashion brand – a rooftop restaurant intended to woo celebrities.

The Beverly Hills Planning Commission on September 8 approved, by a 4-0 vote, a retail and restaurant development at 319-323 North Rodeo Drive. Commissioner Peter Ostroff was not present during the vote.

The project applicant is a limited liability company, 319-323 N. Rodeo LLC, which is associated with Dior’s parent company, LVHM Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton. Dior and LVHM each have their headquarters in Paris.

The sleek expansion of the 319-323 N. Rodeo Drive site follows LVHM’s development of the Cheval Blanc Hotel, which is planned at the corner of Rodeo Drive and South Santa Monica Boulevard. Architect Peter Marino designs both projects.

In addition to Marino, LVHM will work with Los Angeles-based planning and design firm Gruen & Associates to raze the site’s current Dior retail building, according to documents presented to the Planning Commission.

In its place, a 29,700-square-foot, 60-foot-tall building is slated for construction.

Included are two retail floors that the plaintiff considered the “west coast flagship” for the Christian Dior company. The retail space “will feature the latest in men’s and women’s ready-to-wear, timepieces, fine jewelry, fragrances and accessories,” according to the developer’s filing with the city.

The third-floor restaurant “will serve French cuisine and French pastries” from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. each day, with the name of the restaurant undetermined. The rooftop local’s ambitions go beyond serving frog legs and onion soup.

“The rooftop space will be used for exceptional personalized service for Very Important Customers (VICs) and special events and launches,” the filing said.

These include “private events for limited special product launches”, as well as “personal appointments with celebrities and VICs organized by the Dior team in preparation for special events, such as film festivals and price reductions”.

During an hour-long deliberation on the project, commissioners did not focus on the rooftop parties, although Commission Vice-Chairman Gary Ross noted it was the first time that Christian Dior would enter the restaurant business.

Instead, the commissioners led by Jeff Wolfe, sought to better understand the parking lot of the building.

Municipal law stipulates that such a project requires 89 parking spaces. But the plaintiff provided five surface parking spaces and one level of underground parking which includes 29 spaces. The facility will include a hydraulic lift allowing valets to stack cars on top of each other.

The applicant proposed that additional spaces for cyclists as well as parking structures at 9510 North Brighton Way and 345 North Beverly Drive would provide sufficient parking options.

Ashok Vanmali, partner at Gruen Associates, explained that valets will handle parking, including moving cars off site. Wolfe and others expressed concern about congestion on Rodeo Drive and whether there would be enough valets.

While approving the project, Wolfe pledged to monitor the parking situation.

Planning Commission Chair, Myra Demeter, also inquired about parking, but remarked to the applicant, “You have already been very adaptable to our suggestions.

Indeed, LVHM appeared several times before the Planning Commission from March to June in order to iron out traffic problems concerning the nine-storey, 115-room Cheval Blanc. As for the Dior project, it could lead to a sale of land. A company with LVHM’s New York office address purchased part of the property in 2012 for $85 million, according to public records.

Another portion of the land is owned by Beverly Hills Properties III LLC, a company registered by Anthony Palermo, a real estate investor with a business address in Sherman Oaks.

Under an agreement between the owners, LVHM leases land to Beverly Hills Properties, with an option to purchase the property. The LVHM entity has not decided whether or not to buy the land it currently leases on the project site, according to Deborah Quick, a lawyer at Perkins Coie who advises developers.

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The Cugino restaurant will be missed – Hartford Courant https://hotels-benin.com/the-cugino-restaurant-will-be-missed-hartford-courant/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 09:44:27 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/the-cugino-restaurant-will-be-missed-hartford-courant/ It is with sadness that I read the closure of Cugino’s [Connecticut, Page 3, Sept. 7, [“Cugino’s Restaurant closing its doors”]. Farmington is a thriving community with many wonderful restaurants and eating establishments. But Cugino’s has always been a place we could go to consistently enjoy a wonderful meal served in a comfortable and aesthetically […]]]>

It is with sadness that I read the closure of Cugino’s [Connecticut, Page 3, Sept. 7, [“Cugino’s Restaurant closing its doors”]. Farmington is a thriving community with many wonderful restaurants and eating establishments. But Cugino’s has always been a place we could go to consistently enjoy a wonderful meal served in a comfortable and aesthetically pleasing environment.

The atmosphere was welcoming and Mario and Giovanni were the perfect hosts, always greeting guests with a warm welcome and making everyone feel special. In these days of chain restaurants with such high employee turnover, it was comforting to know that at Cugino, you would be remembered and appreciated for your patronage. It seems sad that the new owners of the building could not conclude a rental agreement with the restaurant. My only hope is that Mario and Giovanni open up on another site in Farmington. We need to ensure that this and other great establishments continue to do business in town, especially those that make such a positive contribution to the community.

Patricia Karwoski Farmington

I commend the editorial staff of Hartford Courant for publishing Jennifer Rey’s article [Opinion, Page 5, Sept. 6, “Why nurses are desperate for change and support”]. Unlike Jennifer, I’m not a nurse, but I witnessed Jennifer’s feelings as a patient at Hartford Hospital. I was lucky not to have needed a hospital stay for a long time. That luck recently ran out and resulted in two trips to the ER and five days in the hospital.

The nurses who cared for me in the emergency room and on the second floor of the Conklin Building demonstrated their professionalism in many ways that I cannot explain. I’m not just talking about their knowledge in what they do, but the compassion and care they show.

I witnessed the long hours. Every nurse who treated me worked a minimum of a 12 hour shift. Whenever I needed help day or night, they were at my bedside within minutes. It was obvious that they hadn’t had many breaks, if any.

During my stay in the hospital, I saw more patients, especially in the emergency room, than there are beds or rooms. Seeing nurses working in a chaotic and stressful environment helped me understand why so many nurses left the profession. I also witnessed this firsthand. In five days, I don’t believe I’ve seen a nurse (male or female) who looked over 25 years old.

If you are lucky enough not to need the services of a nurse, this question is probably not that important to you. But if and when that time comes, you’ll be grateful that these professionals are here to help. Let’s not assume they will be there when we need them.

As Jennifer Rey explained in her op-ed, we need to support nurses now. Hospital administrators, medical providers, nursing schools, insurance companies, politicians and the general public can help create a work environment that helps nurses focus on providing care. medical care and provides them with a meaningful work/life balance. It is in our best interest that we do so.

Antonio Cocolla, Newington

The recent Democratic bailout of college loans is likely illegal since Congress did not approve it. It’s an insult to vendors, waiters, carpenters, electricians, plumbers, mechanics, construction workers and others without a college education who now have to repay other loans. It’s also unfair to people who paid for their own trip and that of their children, and to future students who won’t get the same gift. So the next time you hear a Democrat call anyone who disagrees with him an extremist, remember that he supports this blatantly unfair and extreme position that will raise your taxes.

Jim Hoke, Tolland

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How Owamni Became America’s Best New Restaurant https://hotels-benin.com/how-owamni-became-americas-best-new-restaurant/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 10:01:36 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/how-owamni-became-americas-best-new-restaurant/ Contents This content can also be viewed on the site from which it originated. In the summer of 2021, Sean Sherman, a forty-eight-year-old Oglala Lakota chef, opened a restaurant called Owamni, in Minneapolis. Almost overnight, it became the most prominent example of Native American cuisine in the United States. Each dish is prepared without wheat […]]]>

Contents

This content can also be viewed on the site from which it originated.

In the summer of 2021, Sean Sherman, a forty-eight-year-old Oglala Lakota chef, opened a restaurant called Owamni, in Minneapolis. Almost overnight, it became the most prominent example of Native American cuisine in the United States. Each dish is prepared without wheat flour, dairy products, cane sugar, black pepper or any other ingredients introduced to this continent after the arrival of Europeans. Sherman describes the food as “decolonized”; her business partner and co-owner of Owamni, Dana Thompson, calls her “ironically alien.” In June, the James Beard Foundation named Owamni the best new restaurant in the United States.

One evening in May, I met Sherman outside of Owamni, which is located in a park on the Mississippi River. Across the street, water dropped fifty feet into the Saint-Antoine Falls. The area was once the site of a Dakota village known as Owamniyomni, the place of falling and swirling water. Sherman pulled out his phone and showed me an 18th-century drawing of tepees at the edge of the falls. “There was clearly a village here. People everywhere,” he said. “But the Europeans were, like, ‘Your name is St. Anthony now!’ ”

Inside, the dining room was flooded with light from a wall of windows. A bartender named Thor Bearstail delivered glasses of red wine. (Owamni breaks his decolonized rule with drinks, serving coffee, beer and wine.) Bearstail, like the rest of the staff, wore a black T-shirt that read “#86colonialism” on the back. Eighty-six, in kitchen slang, indicates that a dish is sold out. A month earlier, Bearstail, a member of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation in North Dakota, had moved from Fargo to Minneapolis to work at Owamni. His previous job was in a Red Lobster. “Sometimes I have to pinch myself,” he said.

American carnivores tend to think in terms of beef, pork and chicken. Owamni reminds them that the farm animals in the picture books are not native to this continent. My first plate was raw venison, or “game tartare,” listed in a menu section titled “Wamakhaskan,” the Dakota word for animal. The dish was a study in circles: the meat pressed flat and sprinkled with marinated carrots, moons of sumac-dusted duck egg aioli, micro greens and blueberries. A blue corn tostada served as the utensil. One bite was a disco ball in the forest.

Other Wamakhaskan dishes were served: a duck sausage puck, with mashed watercress and roasted turnips; ground elk, served on a chewy corn arepa; and a mixture of cricket and seeds with maple and chilli. “We go through fifteen pounds of crickets a week,” Sherman said. He’s stoutly built, with big black eyes, and he wore a black chef’s jacket, an Apple watch, and a bear-tooth necklace; her hair hung in a braid down to her waist. “It’s a lot,” he said. “Crickets don’t weigh that much.”

“I’m going to go do some laundry, exercise and take a shower.”

Cartoon by Jared Nangle

The gastronomy touted by chefs over the past two decades is, Sherman often says, the way Indigenous peoples have eaten for millennia. The ingredients are local, seasonal, organic. The traditional preservation methods that Owamni offers – smoking, fermentation, drying – are aware. But the restaurant does not offer museum meals; the food is both pre-colonial and modern. There are maple baked beans and cedar braised bison with maple vinegar. Wojape, a Lakota berry sauce, is served with a tepary bean spread and Lake Superior smoked trout. A bowl of charcoal-striped sweet potatoes, drizzled with chili oil, is Sherman’s favorite dish. “It’s so intimate,” he said. “I ate mostly plant-based last year, so this was my favorite.”

I ordered a bowl of manoomin, a hand harvested wild rice. The only place in the world where the manoomin grows is around the Great Lakes. This is part of the origin story of the Ojibwe people, who migrated inland from the east coast centuries ago, following a prophecy to travel west until they found “the food that grows on water. Manoomin is harvested from a canoe, its grains hitting the heads of rice stalks that grow in the shallow waters. Winona LaDuke, an Ojibwe activist, wrote that manoomin is “the first food for a child when he can eat solids; the last food eaten before passing into the spirit world.

At Owamni’s it was chewy and a bit chewy, with a sweet, earthy aroma. I could almost smell the lake. Sherman sources as much Owamni food as he can from indigenous producers. The rice comes from a young Ojibway couple who own a small farm in northern Minnesota. “I had them drop off seven hundred pounds of rice the other day,” he said. “Just stuffed in their car.”

Around 7 pm, two men and a woman, all with little wires behind their ears, paraded through the dining room. Behind them was a familiar face: Deb Haaland, the US Secretary of the Interior and the first Native American cabinet member in US history. She was dining with Minnesota Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan, a member of the White Earth Band of Ojibwe and a regular at Owamni. (“I want to think it’s like my Cheers,” Flanagan told me.) Sherman said hello to the secretary, then stopped by my table. “It’s wild,” he said. “She’s eighth in line for the presidency.”

About two-thirds of Owamni’s staff identify as Indigenous, as do many of its guests. Novelist Louise Erdrich, who owns a bookstore in Minneapolis, is a frequent visitor. Several cast members of the FX series “Reservation Dogs” ate at Owamni last summer, including the show’s star D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai, who was accompanied by model Quannah Chasinghorse. As I left, I passed colorful bouquets of wildflowers on the long bar facing the open kitchen. A neon sign at the entrance reads “You are on native land”. Outside, Sherman demonstrated a set of fire pits to light and noted that the surrounding park catches rainwater. Nearby, the ruins of the Columbia flour mill were lit in amber light. When I noticed all this, Sherman shrugged and said, “Different from the church basement, isn’t it?

I first met Sherman one freezing night in 2017, when he and Thompson hosted a dinner party at the First Universalist Church in Minneapolis. At the time, they were business partners and romantic partners. They ran the Sioux Chef, a food truck and catering business, which Owamni now owns. When I arrived, Thompson, a tall, lively woman, greeted me with cedar-maple tea. “It’s full of flavonoids!” she says.

The purpose of the dinner – a five-course meal prepared by Mr. Karlos Baca, an Indigenous food activist from the Southern Ute Nation – was to announce the launch of a non-profit organization called NATIVE, or North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems, which promotes culinary solutions to economic and health crises. About a hundred people were seated at folding tables. Between classes, Sherman gave a slide presentation. “Food is a language,” he said. “To understand Indigenous food today, you have to know how we got here.

For millennia, the indigenous peoples of what became North America cultivated high-yielding, climate-specific varieties of plants, including Jerusalem artichokes, lamb’s-quarters, squash, knotweed, and lamb’s-foot. goose. By the 13th century, domesticated corn and sunflowers had spread in a green and yellow blaze from Mexico to Maine. “We always have Hidatsa shield beans and Arikara wax beans,” Sherman told diners. “There’s a Lakota squash, the one that’s awesome with the orange flame, and gete okosomin,” a squash that looks like a lifeline, which Baca used for the soup class.

“After those rapids comes the really hard part – a bunch of guys we don’t know talking about crypto at the same time.”

Cartoon by Lars Kenseth

Native Americans hunted game such as bison, which roamed as far east as Buffalo, New York. They harvested fish and shellfish. Tribes in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere used controlled burns, creating grasslands among redwood groves where desirable plants thrived and animals grazed. People everywhere were telling stories and singing songs about their food; in many indigenous languages, plants and animals are called people. “Our ancestors’ diet was almost a perfect diet,” Sherman continued. “That’s what the paleo diet wants to be: gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free.”

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Jackson, MS, restaurants survive water crisis https://hotels-benin.com/jackson-ms-restaurants-survive-water-crisis/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 20:05:37 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/jackson-ms-restaurants-survive-water-crisis/ Many Jackson restaurants are still trying to pick up the pieces as they tackle the daily challenges of the water crisis. Restaurants are reporting that things are slowly returning to normal as water pressure was restored this week. But normalcy always comes with challenges. A boil water advisory still exists and continues to complicate operations. […]]]>

Many Jackson restaurants are still trying to pick up the pieces as they tackle the daily challenges of the water crisis.

Restaurants are reporting that things are slowly returning to normal as water pressure was restored this week. But normalcy always comes with challenges.

A boil water advisory still exists and continues to complicate operations.

“This thing is not over,” said Andy Nesenson, general manager of the downtown Iron Horse Grill. “This has been affecting my restaurant since July 29 when the problems started.”

Latest updates from the Jackson water crisis:Math students donate $5,000 to Jackson flood relief

Cases of water from cities and volunteers from the South were donated to restaurants in the area to meet the needs of customers and the kitchen. And Visit Jackson has set up grant opportunities for restaurants in need, but restaurants continue to struggle financially.

Wait staff called the situation crazy and noted that water issues were limiting menus, which also affected customers.

“It was really tough for us,” said Angela Beeson, office manager at Room Service Restaurant, a popular downtown salad restaurant. Beeson noted that they couldn’t use the drink dispensers at the fountain.

The Iron Horse Grill is one of many restaurants in the Jackson area feeling the effects of the water crisis.

“So far, we’ve been processing this boil water advisory in Jackson for six weeks,” Nesenson said. “It’s had an absolutely negative impact on our business, whether it’s the extra cost to stay open, the cost of buying the water or litter collection boxes. We’re spending between $2,000 and $2,500 per week in addition to reducing the volume of guests walking through the door. This is a recipe for disaster and an industry-wide problem in the Jackson area.”

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Detroit’s Best and Most Anticipated Restaurant Openings, Fall 2022 https://hotels-benin.com/detroits-best-and-most-anticipated-restaurant-openings-fall-2022/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 16:22:48 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/detroits-best-and-most-anticipated-restaurant-openings-fall-2022/ We’ve seen many long-awaited restaurant openings in Metro Detroit get some love over the summer and a few that come much closer to fruition. With many advances in COVID-19 vaccines, we are seeing some momentum with projects that have long been delayed for various reasons. An opening date is a moving target for any restaurant, […]]]>

We’ve seen many long-awaited restaurant openings in Metro Detroit get some love over the summer and a few that come much closer to fruition. With many advances in COVID-19 vaccines, we are seeing some momentum with projects that have long been delayed for various reasons.

An opening date is a moving target for any restaurant, but for now, here are some of the most exciting restaurants slated to open in the next few months.


Trumbull Brewery and Distillery

Opening the project: End of 2023

Key players: Rick Stanza and Mike Gill

In a 5,000 square foot space, Trumbull Brewing and Distillery will produce beer, cider, wine and spirits on site. Food options will also be available such as American cuisine with vegan and vegetarian options. As of September 2022, a source of funding to cover the cost of the renovations is still ongoing. 1515 W. Lafayette, Detroit.


cibo

Projected opening: End of 2022

Key player: Koucar Management

The future Cambria Hotel downtown will feature a few new food and beverage options. For fine dining options, Cibo Detroit will serve a fusion of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Greek and Italian cuisine. Alongside Cibo, a third location for the fast-casual Detroit Taco Company is slated to open in late fall. For nightlife, a rooftop bar called Cielo Detroit is set to launch in the spring of 2023 or weather permitting, the lobby bar, Beve Detroit, will offer local beers and tapas, and a speakeasy that has no yet been named will be launched next year. The hotel, located in the former home of WWJ Radio, will include 158 hotel rooms. 600 W. Lafayette Blvd., Detroit.


Paradise Deli and Marketplace

Projected opening: April/May 2023

Key players: Nezaa Bandele, Allied Media Projects

Mama Nezaa has been feeding activists her Caribbean-inspired cuisine through her restaurant and pop-up company Paradise Foods for decades. Now she’s working on opening a restaurant called Paradise Deli and Marketplace, offering groceries, take-out options, a cafe, nutrition classes, and a ghost kitchen. The new space will hire nearby residents and will be located on the ground floor of the Love Building, currently being redeveloped as the new headquarters for the nonprofit Allied Media Projects. 4641 Grand River Avenue, Detroit.


Pop’s Corner Cafe and Market

Projected opening: End of 2023

Key players: Rick Stanza, Jonathan Hartzell, Ashley Price

In the McDougall-Hunt neighborhood of Detroit, Pop’s Corner Cafe and Market is intended to provide local residents with fresh food options. The 1,800-square-foot former liquor store is named after “Pops,” the space’s former owner and local staple, who recently passed away from COVID-19. His sons sold the building and Detroit Rising Development now uses the property to provide a quick stop for coffee from James Oliver Coffee, donuts, bagels, and more. Stanza tells Eater that he is still working to determine a source of funding to complete the project. 2740 Mt. Elliott, Detroit.


soul of detroit

Projected opening: End of 2022

Key players: Jerome B. Brown, Samuel VanBuren

The original Detroit Soul will soon host a second location on East Jefferson. The company started as a take-out and catering business on Eight Mile and is now bringing flavor to the Far East with dinner seating as well as take-out. 14300 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit.


Bashan Detroit

Design by Simeone Deary

Projected opening: Fall 2022

Key players: Four-Man Scale, Michael Gray

The operators behind Gray Ghost and Second Best bar, both in Brush Park, are working on opening an izakaya-inspired spot, Bashan, near Little Caesars Arena. Named after a mythological fire-breathing fowl, Basan will emphasize the Japanese fireside cooking method – robatayaki (or robata) izakaya. Chefs John Vermiglio and Joe Giacomino will create dishes such as fried bologna bao and shoyu-glazed baby back ribs with wasabi potato dumplings, while Will Lee will continue his bartending magic as beverage director. 2703 Park Avenue, Detroit.


midnight temple

Projected opening: Spring 2022

Key players: Akash Sudhakara and Chief Bharath Reddy

This Indian street food spot opened briefly in 2020 when operators started cooking masala dosa, Hakka noodles, samosas and other dishes from an outdoor space on Riopelle in the Eastern Market . This experience was short-lived, but Midnight Temple operates outdoors as the owner continues to renovate its interior space with guest chefs, weekend DJs and henna parties will also be regular features. 2466 Riopelle Street, Detroit.


Jollibee

Projected opening: End of 2022

Founded in 1978 in the Philippines, Jollibee has enjoyed resounding success since the fast-food chain began expanding in the United States. Famous for its fried chicken, spaghetti, peach-mango pie and family buckets, Michigan’s first location is set to open this summer in a former Denny’s near Hall Road. Construction on the 2,500 square foot space was scheduled to begin in January 2022 and is expected to employ around 75 workers. 44945 Woodridge Drive, Sterling Heights.


Rosemary

Projected opening: End of 2022

Key player: Chief Maxcel Hardy

This casual dining spot is among chef Maxcel Hardy’s upcoming projects. Rosemary will offer 25 seats in a historic plaza alongside the Red Jazz Shoe Shine Parlor in the North End. As the name suggests, rosemary will be central to many dishes, including rosemary garlic chicken, garlic herb roast vegetables, garlic truffle fries, blackened salmon and the rosemary-garlic bourbon steak. Rosemary will also offer weekend brunch. 9421 John R. Road, Detroit


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