Room Services – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 22:57:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hotels-benin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Room Services – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ 32 32 Braswell Comptroller releases health equity analysis of state health plan – Office of the State Comptroller https://hotels-benin.com/braswell-comptroller-releases-health-equity-analysis-of-state-health-plan-office-of-the-state-comptroller/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 20:04:05 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/braswell-comptroller-releases-health-equity-analysis-of-state-health-plan-office-of-the-state-comptroller/ Study shows preventative care initiative effective in tackling healthcare inequities Comptroller Natalie Braswell on Monday released a detailed health equity analysis of the state employee health plan, the first of its kind, and a set of corresponding recommendations to reduce racial and gender disparities across the state. Braswell and Governor Ned Lamont have highlighted the […]]]>

Study shows preventative care initiative effective in tackling healthcare inequities

Comptroller Natalie Braswell on Monday released a detailed health equity analysis of the state employee health plan, the first of its kind, and a set of corresponding recommendations to reduce racial and gender disparities across the state.

Braswell and Governor Ned Lamont have highlighted the importance of preventative care in addressing racial inequities in health care, citing the state’s Health Improvement Program (HEP), credited with reducing disparities race and ethnicity in cancer screening and chronic disease management.

“By prioritizing preventative care and breaking down barriers between patients and their doctors, the state’s plan effectively addresses the racial disparities that commonly plague the health care system,” said Controller Natalie Braswell. “Since the implementation of the HEP program, my office has heard from many members who were able to detect cancer early and now credit the program with saving their lives. Everyone in Connecticut deserves access to similar programs, no matter where they work or live.

“Life-saving preventative care must be readily available to everyone in our state,” said Governor Ned Lamont. “Regular screenings can detect the disease at an early stage, protecting patients from catastrophic health and financial problems. Our administration has prioritized expanding access to these services to address racial inequities and improve public health. I will continue to work directly with all parts of our health care industry to ensure that every Connecticut resident can access and pay for the care they need.

Last year’s budget adjustment (Public Law 22-118) includes a provision introduced by the Governor’s administration to require health carriers to offer versions of HEP to their enrolled members. These plans must be available by January 1, 2024.

The Health Equity Analysis compares medical and prescription drug claims under the Government Employees Health Plan to a benchmark of nearly 100 other health plans, including including multi-employer and public sector plans, covering nearly two million members. Usage data was used to measure racial and gender disparities in several key areas.

The state plan far exceeded the benchmark across all racial groups for screening for breast, prostate, colorectal and cervical cancers. Almost all racial groups also exceeded the benchmark for chronic disease management, including regular testing and medication adherence. This is largely due to the plan’s preventative care initiatives that encourage members to receive recommended age-based screenings.

Notable disparities were detected in emergency room visits. Black and Hispanic members were more likely to seek emergency care and less likely to receive preventive visits. The same is true for low-income members and in geographic areas where access to providers is limited. Nonwhite diet participants also had a higher prevalence of diabetes.

The analysis was carried out by Segal, a firm of independent actuaries, and in consultation with Health Equity Solutions (HES), who collaborated on the design of the study and its recommendations.

“HES applauds the State Employee Health Plan’s commitment to health equity and its willingness to build on its efforts to ensure its enrollees all have the opportunity to avoid illness and injury. preventable,” said Ayesha Clarke, Acting Managing Director of Health Equity Solutions. “Health inequalities persist at all income levels, and this study shows that government employees are no exception. What is exceptional is the commitment of the Office of the State Comptroller to assess and address these inequities, especially for Black, Latino/a and other people of color enrolled in the United States Health Plan. state employees. We are pleased to see the report made public and look forward to hearing how the recommendations to improve data collection and access to preventive health care will be implemented.

Among the report’s recommendations, the state’s health plan should survey members to identify the causes of persistent disparities, expand communications with members, and continue to work directly with doctors, hospitals and provider groups to eliminate barriers to care.

More broadly, the recommendations include an expansion of statewide preventive care by offering a version of the state’s Health Enhancement Program (HEP) to more residents. Increased access to affordable high-speed Internet is recommended to address telehealth disparities, especially in low-income communities.

“This analysis shows many areas where the state’s health plan is effectively addressing persistent health care disparities, particularly in cancer screenings and chronic disease treatment,” said Braswell Controller. “It also shows areas where there is room for improvement and many recommendations that the state health plan and other health plans across the state can implement to further address racial disparities and gender throughout the health system. It is our shared responsibility to make health care affordable and accessible to everyone in Connecticut. Every healthcare organization should engage in this type of review to identify its own strengths and weaknesses, and then take action. We need more data, at all levels, to better diagnose the causes of disparities and continue to develop effective solutions. »

Comptroller Braswell administers the Connecticut State Health Plan, the largest employer-based plan in the state, covering more than 250,000 state and municipal workers, retirees, and dependents. The analysis uses data from the state employee health plan, the largest and most robust dataset.

The report can be viewed on the Monitor’s website, here: osc.ct.gov/reports

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County Grant Workshops Scheduled https://hotels-benin.com/county-grant-workshops-scheduled/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 02:02:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/county-grant-workshops-scheduled/ Four public workshops are planned across the county to help communities apply for funding from the Community Development Block Grant program. The federal program provides annual grants to states, cities and counties, and San Diego County is accepting applications for funding through November 4. Grants have been used by many municipalities to improve neighborhoods by […]]]>

Four public workshops are planned across the county to help communities apply for funding from the Community Development Block Grant program.

The federal program provides annual grants to states, cities and counties, and San Diego County is accepting applications for funding through November 4. Grants have been used by many municipalities to improve neighborhoods by funding local youth and senior centers, parks, streets, drainage systems, accessibility issues, and fire facilities.

Community members and non-profit organizations are invited to propose projects that benefit low- and middle-income residents in unincorporated areas of the county. Projects must align with the County Consolidated Plan and:

  • Increase the availability of affordable, supportive housing.
  • Improve the quality, safety, accessibility and walkability of communities.
  • Increase and maintain accessible and supportive shelters and services for the homeless.

County Housing and Community Development Services has scheduled four informational workshops, one virtual and three in-person, on the CDBG program and how to apply. The schedule:

  • 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sept. 26, virtual workshop. Download the link to the workshop at bit.ly/3xngVmL. Password: CDBG.
  • 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 27, Lincoln Acres Community Room, 2717 Granger Ave., National City.
  • 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. September 28, Lakeside Community Center, 9841 Vine Street, Lakeside.
  • 10 a.m. to noon September 29, Fallbrook Library Community Room, 124 S. Mission Road, Fallbrook.

Find details, including a narrated presentation, at https://bit.ly/2MkEJiM.

Contact Marco De La Toba at (858) 694-8724 or marco.delatoba@sdcounty.ca.gov. People who are hard of hearing can call (866) 945-2207.

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Alyson Crafton wants to start a fire https://hotels-benin.com/alyson-crafton-wants-to-start-a-fire/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 18:18:06 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/alyson-crafton-wants-to-start-a-fire/ Alyson’s ‘accidental career path’ went from family therapy fantasies to managing IT operations Getting rid of impostor syndrome is advice she gives to young women “I manage the internal activities of the IT organization,” says Alyson Crafton, head of the Global Information Systems (GIS) Common Services organization. “My team’s job is to facilitate the work […]]]>
  • Alyson’s ‘accidental career path’ went from family therapy fantasies to managing IT operations
  • Getting rid of impostor syndrome is advice she gives to young women

“I manage the internal activities of the IT organization,” says Alyson Crafton, head of the Global Information Systems (GIS) Common Services organization. “My team’s job is to facilitate the work of my peers so that they can focus on providing IT services to the business!” This is no easy task given that GIS has over 250 employees worldwide whose work affects how we work. (Do you think your laptop magically came out of nowhere, or our payroll system is ready to go right out of the box?)

On September 22, Alyson will appear at the Grace Hopper Conference in Florida alongside Lubab-Davis sheetVice President of Strategy and Innovation, and Soon KuekGeneral Manager of Lam’s Malaysian Operations. The trio will lead a workshop on career development and empowerment. Grace Hopper is the premier conference in the United States for women in technology.

We caught up with Alyson in late August to talk about her career and get her advice for young women starting their careers. We also found out what her dad thinks she does for a living. (He’s a long way off.) The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

What exactly are you doing?

Officially, I lead the GIS common services organization. I think of myself as the COO of IT—COO of information technology. I run the IT organization management business. My team of 11 puts processes, tools and accountability systems in place so that IT can do its job easily. We also develop fundraising strategies for our service, participate in annual operating reviews, and assist with organizational change management, program management, and vendor management.

Describe your professional background.

I like to say that I had an accidental career path. I started out thinking I would be a family therapist, but changed course and got an MBA in finance. I then went to Intel where I spent 25 years. At Intel, I had many roles, as you can imagine. I have held positions in the supply chain IT organization for 10 years. Then I spent time going back and forth between the IT and operations teams.

What attracted you to Lam?

A friend of mine connected me with Rob Hawthorne, our director of information. In my first conversation with him, we talked about the transformation he wanted to bring to the GIS organization. I was drawn to the challenge and the opportunity to bring about real change. Lam was – and still is – ready for significant growth and change.

I was also struck by Lam’s genuine commitment to his core values. Everyone I interviewed truly embodied these values.

Click here to see job openings at Lam

What motivates you?

The opportunity to have an impact on a daily basis. I’ve had roles where my job was just to make things work. And I’m part of it. But we have so many opportunities within GIS and within the company. What got us here will not get us to the next phase. We must change, refine and mature to get where we want to be.

I like being able to improve processes. I hope I can also bring out the best in people. I like to see others grow. Helping people think differently or achieve something great motivates me. I want to leave Lam’s employees better than I met them. You could say I get my motherly fix at work now that my kids are adults and out of the house.

Describe your leadership style.

Years ago, I decided it would be the four Fs: firm, fair, fast, and fun. I try to listen so that we can all move forward. I also think it is important for leaders to take a stand. Leaders must be able to change their minds. Be flexible, yes, but have a point of view. You have to steer the ship in one direction and do it in a friendly way. I also want to build relationships, be a connector.

I spend a lot of time with Lam, so I want to make sure I’m friendly and fun. There is room at work to have a good time! Having fun goes a long way in keeping people engaged and productive.

What three words would you use to describe yourself?

Energetic. Driven. I am patient.

Energy is important. People get their energy from leaders. I want to be the person who gives energy, not who drains it.

I am also self-motivated or results-oriented. We are here to get things done. There’s room to chat and slow down, but ultimately let’s do things that move the ball down the court.

Impatience is a strength and a curse. I will always work on my need to go-go-go. I have a general sense of urgency. I want to get things done quickly without sacrificing quality. We have huge aspirations. It takes a results-based approach to get things done. I want to light a fire!

And what three words would your teammates use to describe you?

I am patient! [laughter]. Also positive and connector. We work in a system. I’m trying to understand how this person’s work connects to another person’s work and brings things together.

What are you talking about at Grace Hopper?

I’m on a panel with Lubab and Soon titled “Breaking Barriers Through Innovation”. At Grace Hopper, among others, young women seek advice on how to navigate their careers. We will talk about the challenges we have encountered in our careers and how, through innovation, we have overcome these obstacles.

What is the takeaway you want attendees to take home?

I’ll give you two.

First, I want women to be authentic. You can be authentic and successful. Get rid of the impostor syndrome. Don’t try to be a man. Be yourself. I am a great example. I had a successful career just being me.

Second, Lam is a really cool place with cool women at the helm! We want to make attendees more curious about our company.

What career advice do you have for young women in tech?

I’ve learned over the course of my career that women tend to hide their personalities at work, for whatever reason. Be your authentic self. Stay curious. Build a wide range of experiences throughout your career. I worked on the technical side and the commercial side. Thanks to this, I was able to make connections and create end-to-end solutions. Building a broad perspective makes you more effective.

And if you want to be a mom, be a mom! I left Intel as VP and joined Lam as GM…and had four kids along the way!

Click here to see job openings at Lam

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Officials consider new closing date for Sununu Youth Services Center https://hotels-benin.com/officials-consider-new-closing-date-for-sununu-youth-services-center/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 19:40:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/officials-consider-new-closing-date-for-sununu-youth-services-center/ A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety. The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. […]]]>

A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety. The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. Frustrated with spending $13 million a year to operate a 144-bed facility for a dozen teenagers, lawmakers set a mandatory March 1 closing date. But the center’s fate remains uncertain after lawmakers could not agree this year on how to replace it. Rep. Jess Edwards, R-Auburn, said Friday he plans to introduce two bills for the legislative session that begins in January: one to extend the three-month deadline and another that calls for a new installation of 12 to 14 beds, with room for 18 if required. He told Deputy Health Commissioner Lori Weaver he was worried about what would happen on March 1 without such measures. “The Legislature has let you down,” he said. “We just couldn’t come to an agreement, so we didn’t give you anything in the way of money to plan and design it.” Weaver said she could not predict the population of the center six months in advance, but based on the current situation, “there would be a definite impact on public safety” if the deadline arrived without further indication. . “If this were to happen today, I could tell you that there would be a public risk for some of these young people to be placed in situations that would not only be dangerous for them, but potentially for the community as well,” he said. she said Friday at a meeting of the Health and Social Services Oversight Committee. The youth center, named after former governor John H. Sununu, has been under criminal investigation since 2019 and 11 former workers were arrested last year. The state recently created a $100 million fund to settle the claims of nearly 450 former residents who sued the state for abuse allegations involving more than 150 staff members from 1963 to 2018. Over the In recent weeks, the police have repeatedly responded to the establishment to help the staff. deal with disturbances. Weaver told lawmakers the incidents were not unusual, but a severe understaffing coupled with the “toughest kids” created a “perfect storm” that required outside help. Lawmakers recently approved salary increases for staff, but recruitment remains a challenge given the impending shutdown date, she said. “I think there are a lot of people who want to come and help and work,” she said, adding that the closing date “overshadows the facility for sure.”

A New Hampshire lawmaker on Friday proposed extending the March deadline to close the state’s troubled youth detention center over concerns that the current timeline could endanger public safety.

The debate over the future of the Sununu youth services center in Manchester began years ago but has boiled over amid horrific allegations of sexual abuse. Frustrated with spending $13 million a year to operate a 144-bed facility for a dozen teenagers, lawmakers set a mandatory March 1 closing date. But the center’s fate remains uncertain after lawmakers could not agree this year on how to replace it.

Rep. Jess Edwards, R-Auburn, said Friday he plans to introduce two bills for the legislative session that begins in January: one to extend the three-month deadline and another that calls for a new installation of 12 to 14 beds, with room for 18 if required. He told Deputy Health Commissioner Lori Weaver he was worried about what would happen on March 1 without such measures.

“The Legislature has let you down,” he said. “We just couldn’t come to an agreement, so we didn’t give you anything in the way of money to plan and design it.”

Weaver said she could not predict the population of the center six months in advance, but based on the current situation, “there would be a definite impact on public safety” if the deadline arrived without further indication. .

“If this were to happen today, I could tell you that there would be a public risk that some of these young people would be placed in situations that would not only be dangerous for them, but potentially for the community as well,” he said. she said Friday at a meeting of the Health and Social Services Oversight Committee.

The youth center, named after former governor John H. Sununu, has been under criminal investigation since 2019 and 11 former workers were arrested last year. The state recently established a $100 million fund to settle claims filed by nearly 450 former residents who sued the state over abuse allegations involving more than 150 staff members from 1963 to 2018.

In recent weeks, police have intervened at the facility on several occasions to help staff deal with the disturbances. Weaver told lawmakers the incidents were not unusual, but a severe understaffing coupled with the “toughest kids” created a “perfect storm” that required outside help. Lawmakers recently approved salary increases for staff, but recruitment remains a challenge given the impending shutdown date, she said.

“I think there are a lot of people who want to come and help and work,” she said, adding that the closing date “for sure overshadows the establishment.”

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Local mental health, bereavement support services – ‘The Press Room’ episode 8 https://hotels-benin.com/local-mental-health-bereavement-support-services-the-press-room-episode-8/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 15:13:25 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/local-mental-health-bereavement-support-services-the-press-room-episode-8/ Open the audio article player By Kristen Weaver | on September 10, 2022 Audio articles on Wilson County News made possible by C Street Gift Shop in downtown Floresville The press room is produced by the Wilson County News’ WCNTV. On this week’s episode of The Press Room, we talk about the following topics from […]]]>
Open the audio article player

Kristen Weaver

Audio articles on Wilson County News made possible by C Street Gift Shop in downtown Floresville

The press room is produced by the Wilson County News’ WCNTV. On this week’s episode of The Press Room, we talk about the following topics from recent editions of the Wilson County News more in detail:

— Getting into the groove with local mental health service providers
– The story of a retired Green Beret and his father’s journey through grief
— Resources and services available for residents struggling with bereavement

The following services and contacts are provided in this video:
Mental health support
Morning Star Family Medicine
Camino Real Community Services
The Ecumenical Center for Education, Counseling and Health
Courage Ranch
Bereavement support
The South Texas Hope Healing Center
South Texas Children’s Bereavement Center
The Ecumenical Center for Education, Counseling and Health
Grace Bible Church’s Hope for Healing Hearts

Find the following article from August 31 Wilson County News for more information:
—Bernard Cenney: www.wilsoncountynews.com/articles/green-beret-dad-bernard-cenney-turns-grief-into-adventure-novels/

Follow us where you watch so you never miss an episode of The Press Room or any other WCN TV news.

Don’t forget that YOU can share your news with the Wilson County News! Email us at reader@wcn-online.com to see if your photos or stories can be featured in a future edition of our journal.

Subscribe: www.wilsoncountynews.com/subscribe/
Free News: www.wilsoncountynews.com/freenews/
Visit us online at www.wilsoncountynews.com for more information on any of the topics covered.
You can also watch this video at www.wilsoncountynews.com/video-vault/

Questions? Contact us at 830-216-4519 or email julia@wcn-online.com.

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Mississippi’s only burn center will close Oct. 14 https://hotels-benin.com/mississippis-only-burn-center-will-close-oct-14/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 00:40:59 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/mississippis-only-burn-center-will-close-oct-14/ JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi’s only burn center will close Oct. 14, hospital officials said Thursday. The JMS Burn and Reconstruction Center, located at Merit Health Central in South Jackson, includes 13 burn intensive care rooms, 20 burn patient rooms, and a 12-room outpatient clinic. The center takes care of adult and pediatric burn victims […]]]>

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi’s only burn center will close Oct. 14, hospital officials said Thursday.

The JMS Burn and Reconstruction Center, located at Merit Health Central in South Jackson, includes 13 burn intensive care rooms, 20 burn patient rooms, and a 12-room outpatient clinic. The center takes care of adult and pediatric burn victims in hospitalization and on an outpatient basis.

After Oct. 14, burn patients will be referred to Doctors Hospital in Augusta, Georgia, Firefighters Burn Center – Regional One Health in Memphis, Tennessee or USA Health in Mobile, Alabama, the Clarion Ledger reported.

According to a hospital statement. “The COVID-19 pandemic and challenging staffing and recruiting environment has made it increasingly difficult for us to recruit the range of specialists needed to maintain the burns program, which is the main reason for which we have made the difficult decision to close.”

The hospital said the Burn & Hand Rehabilitative Services Clinic will continue to provide care to these current patients until they are transferred to other appropriate medical practices,” the hospital said.

The hospital said it was in talks with other regional providers to explore the possibility of setting up a burn program.

“We are grateful that we have been able to meet the burns and reconstruction needs of patients in our state and across the region for the past 14 years,” the hospital said.

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SF is evicting its most vulnerable tenants closer to pre-pandemic levels. But official figures do not show the extent of the crisis https://hotels-benin.com/sf-is-evicting-its-most-vulnerable-tenants-closer-to-pre-pandemic-levels-but-official-figures-do-not-show-the-extent-of-the-crisis/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 00:57:10 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/sf-is-evicting-its-most-vulnerable-tenants-closer-to-pre-pandemic-levels-but-official-figures-do-not-show-the-extent-of-the-crisis/ Evictions from San Francisco housing units for formerly homeless people have risen sharply over the past year, a sign that the city’s most vulnerable residents – who usually have nowhere to go but are returning to the street – are increasingly at risk of losing their homes as the city emerges from the pandemic. At […]]]>

Evictions from San Francisco housing units for formerly homeless people have risen sharply over the past year, a sign that the city’s most vulnerable residents – who usually have nowhere to go but are returning to the street – are increasingly at risk of losing their homes as the city emerges from the pandemic.

At least 114 people were officially evicted from single-room hotels, or SROs, in the financial year that ended June 30, a significant increase from the previous year, when 40 people were evicted from city-funded and often overlooked buildings. , according to a Chronicle analysis of data recently released by the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing. The percentage of households displaced from these hotels increased from 0.7% to 1.8%.

A small number of ORS accounted for a significant share of evictions last year: The Chronicle found that more than half of all evictions took place in nine serviced apartments, which housed 16% of all housing residents with ORS support services.

Emily Cohen, spokeswoman for the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing, or HSH, said the agency expects such an increase in evictions this year, given that pandemic-related restrictions on the eviction of tenants have eased. She said MSM is “proud” of the relatively low eviction rate and that it proves that permanent supportive housing is “one of the strongest and most effective solutions we have to end homelessness for people with really complex needs.

But a Chronicle investigation published last month found that under Mayor London Breed’s administration, these official statistics represent only part of the displacement within the $160 million permanent supportive housing system from San Francisco. Journalists have discovered that countless tenants are being forced out of their SROs through informal channels or by means that MSM does not follow.

Nonprofits that contract with MSM to run ORS typically evict residents for the same issues that qualified them for supportive housing programs in the first place: poverty, mental illness, trauma, or inability to care for their lives. ‘themselves. With limited options, according to The Chronicle, many people are once again finding themselves homeless.

“Unfortunately, there are sometimes individuals who need to be evicted from buildings for the safety and well-being of all residents,” Breed spokesman Jeff Cretan said in a statement Tuesday. “Housing is critical to helping people transition out of homelessness, and our department staff and nonprofit providers will continue to work with individuals to keep them in stable housing.”

Prior to 2020, nearly half of residents who were officially evicted from supportive housing ORS were evicted for owing money, according to HSH records. Due to new laws and financial relief programs that have almost entirely prevented evictions for non-payment of rent, the number of official evictions in city-funded ORS is still lower than before the pandemic, when the rates fluctuated between 2.2% and 2.6%.

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Sex worker Madeleine Lewin is on trial over the death of a client in a hotel room in Cairns https://hotels-benin.com/sex-worker-madeleine-lewin-is-on-trial-over-the-death-of-a-client-in-a-hotel-room-in-cairns/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:48:38 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/sex-worker-madeleine-lewin-is-on-trial-over-the-death-of-a-client-in-a-hotel-room-in-cairns/ A sex worker accused of causing a client’s death had little experience performing “domineering-type services”, a court has heard. Key points: Anthony Michael Brady, 52, was found dead in a hotel room in Cairns in August 2020 Sex worker Madeleine Joan Lewin is on trial for manslaughter Prosecution alleges Ms Lewin was criminally negligent while […]]]>

A sex worker accused of causing a client’s death had little experience performing “domineering-type services”, a court has heard.

Madeleine Joan Lewin, 34, is on trial for manslaughter in connection with the death of Anthony Brady, whose body was found in a sixth-floor room of a Cairns hotel.

Cairns Supreme Court heard that Mr Brady, 52, had planned to meet Ms Lewin at the Sunshine Tower Hotel on the evening of August 12, 2020.

In his opening address to the jury, Crown Prosecutor Nathan Crane said Mr Brady was in the hotel room “under an alleged consensual arrangement”.

But, he alleged, an “inherently dangerous” sex act, which Ms Lewin had oversight of, went wrong.

Mr Crane said Mr Brady was found with his legs and wrists bound, a hood over his head and a gag in his mouth.

The probable cause of his death was “mechanical asphyxiation”, the court said.

Ms Lewin, who is representing herself in the proceedings, has pleaded not guilty.

The court heard Mr Brady was found dead at the Sunshine Tower Hotel.(ABC Far North: Christopher Testa)

Former clients to testify

Mr Crane said that “the combination of the elements [found in the hotel room] was inherently lethal” and that Ms. Lewin had a duty to be “hypervigilant as to her health and safety”.

However, he said it was not clear that Ms Lewin had “a significant degree of experience” in dominatrix-type services.

She had only bought the gag found with Mr Brady hours before her first message the day before, the court heard.

The jury was told they would hear evidence during the trial from former clients of Ms Lewin and the director of a website on which she listed her services under a pseudonym.

Mr Brady was in Cairns for work and was reported missing after he failed to vacate his room at another hotel and failed to attend certain work-related duties the day after his death.

The court heard he had already checked in for his flight back to Brisbane shortly before walking to meet Ms Lewin.

His wife is also among the witnesses in the trial.

The trial before Judge James Henry continues.

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The range of career options for people with autism https://hotels-benin.com/the-range-of-career-options-for-people-with-autism/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 16:23:08 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/the-range-of-career-options-for-people-with-autism/ Hand put wooden cube block on blue background with word CAREER and copy space for your text. … [+] Business career planning growth to success concept Getty Many people with autism want to work, but companies often lack the knowledge to build and manage an inclusive workforce. A conservative estimate is that approximately 50,000 to […]]]>

Many people with autism want to work, but companies often lack the knowledge to build and manage an inclusive workforce.

A conservative estimate is that approximately 50,000 to 60,000 autistic people turn 18 each year. They graduate from high school and are ready for college and careers, but four in 10 adults with autism never work for pay between high school and their early 20s.

“It’s easy to assume generalities about people with disabilities, as most autistic people are good with computers and don’t like conversing with others,” said Melissa Skaggs, owner of The Hive. “One of our employees frequently reveals to customers that he has autism and likes to chat with new people who come to our café. Another autistic employee stays in the kitchen almost 100% of the time and rarely goes outside the house, even to serve plates.Our employees are placed based on their personalities rather than their diagnoses.

Talent, creativity and craftsmanship abound in people with autism, and countless industries await their contributions and innovations. The options stretch, from accounting and the arts to factories and catering.

It’s time to change society’s perception of how companies can seamlessly employ and integrate people with autism into their workplaces and raise awareness that people with autism can be valuable productive employees in all industries. .

Jobs for all skill levels and levels of creativity

There are many companies and businesses for people with autism that could be valuable resources. But, like everyone else, it’s about discovering everyone’s talent and supporting their efforts to surpass themselves.

“I think it starts with learning the passion of being a neurodivergent person,” said Ryan Casey, executive director of ClearWave Careers. “It doesn’t have to be an exact match, but at least a close match. For example, if you have someone who likes to edit videos, even if they work in a restaurant, see if that person could help you with the restaurant’s TikTok and Instagram. and upload videos a few hours a week.”

Here are some of the career areas we’ll be exploring in the coming weeks:

  • Arts: Hands-on physical arts work that would be suitable for people with autism includes house painting, 2D and 3D arts, framing, pottery/ceramist, printmaking, woodworking, acting, and performing instrumental music and vocal. Digital arts opportunities include graphic design, animation, visual effects, photography, architecture, illustration, and CAD design.
  • The science sector: Positions such as research assistant, reference librarian, genealogist, pharmacy technician, university researcher, laboratory technician or scientist could correspond to those on the spectrum. Analytical skills and following procedures are essential for jobs in science, and people with autism can enjoy an environment where these traits are highly valued.
  • Journalism: Whether it’s an article researcher, writer, fact checker, technical writer, or journalist, there’s room for those on the spectrum. to pursue this area. The solitary and independent nature of the work could add to the appeal of these types of jobs, as journalism generally allows people to set their own pace.
  • Production line: Leveraging the skills some possess for routine and repetitive actions, employees with autism can thrive as assembly line workers in manufacturing companies, automobile factories, electronics factories, computer factories, recycling plants or roles such as parcel handler, loading supervisor and mail processor.
  • Food Service and Beverage Industry: Any role in a commercial kitchen could be suitable, including culinary arts chef, baker, or support roles like prep cook, line cook, sous chef, dishwasher, or server. Additionally, as the microbrewery and microdistillation industries grow, there is room for shift brewers, production brewery, and distillery workers in local and national operations. The food and beverage industries need people of all skill levels to be efficient so adults with autism can find their niche.
  • Fashion and distribution: Those on the spectrum could be designers, pattern makers, launderers and dry cleaners, window dressers, pressers, cutters or garment workers. The fashion and retail industries have room for people with diverse skill sets. These industries are as much about what happens behind the scenes as what is on display. There is incredible potential for autism-specific innovations, such as creating sensory clothing for certain people on the spectrum.
  • Accounting and finance: Recognizing patterns and having a long attention span are huge advantages when working with financial information. Possible roles include a CPA, tax preparer, actuary, investment analyst, accountant, billing specialist, or accounts payable clerk.
  • Hospitals: Depending on their skill level, people on the spectrum could become doctors or nurses, work in administrative positions, or be janitors. Hospital jobs can straddle IT, accounting/finance, and maintaining medical records for a doctor’s office or surgery center.
  • Computer science: People with autism spectrum disorders can be incredibly skilled as network engineers, web developers, web designers, software engineers and database administrators – logical minds and good problem solvers of all kinds and highly valued in the computer world.
  • Agriculture/Animal Science: Some members of the spectrum have a unique understanding of animals and may have an easier time relating to animals. This could benefit roles such as vet tech, groomer, dog walker, trainer, equine trainer, zookeeper, livestock trainer, or animal keeper.

Why Hire Neurodiverse Employees

“Want fewer no-shows and more registered applications?” asks Skaggs. “Open up your hiring policy to include neurodiversity. People with different abilities are grateful to be employed.”

There are many reasons to consider hiring neurodiverse people. For example, a 2018 study by Accenture, AAPD, and Disability found that of the companies they researched that hired people on the spectrum, they achieved, on average, 28% higher revenue, the double the net income and a 30% higher economic profit. margins compared to other companies in the same sample.

“It would be easy to meet employment needs by tapping into this underappreciated talent pool,” Casey said. “All you would need to do is some basic training to at least start this process. Neurodivergent can bring a new perspective and innovation. Think of what Einstein, Tesla and Turing – people who have been considered neurodivergent – and the value they brought to the world. Your organization will be ‘a cut above’ in both intelligence and perspective.'”

The Harvard Business Review supports hiring people with autism as a competitive advantage. They say the results include increased morale, improved products and services, higher productivity and ultimately increased bottom line.

As Skaggs adds, it also feels good to be inclusive.

“The inclusion of neurodiversity creates opportunities for a sense of humility — and a kind of ‘I’m fine, you’re fine, we’re all fine’ type of mentality, as well as vulnerability,” she said. declared. “Ask a great HR manager, and that’s the holy grail for team building!”

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Pregnant mothers turned away from Perth hospitals due to healthcare worker shortages https://hotels-benin.com/pregnant-mothers-turned-away-from-perth-hospitals-due-to-healthcare-worker-shortages/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 00:11:33 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/pregnant-mothers-turned-away-from-perth-hospitals-due-to-healthcare-worker-shortages/ There was no room in a Perth hospital delivery room when San-Mari Andrea Krugel arrived after feeling contractions. Key points: Hundreds of pregnant women have been bypassed in the past year Advocates push for more midwife-led maternity care State government says labor shortage is a huge impediment She had received all of her previous maternity […]]]>

There was no room in a Perth hospital delivery room when San-Mari Andrea Krugel arrived after feeling contractions.

She had received all of her previous maternity care at this hospital, but on the day her baby Mias was due to arrive, she was turned away.

“I felt like [if] I’ve booked at Osborne Park, I’ll have my baby at Osborne Park no matter what,” she said.

“Am I just going to have my baby on the floor? What’s going on?”

For more than 12 hours, Mrs Krugel and her husband were stuck in limbo without knowing where they would end up.

Eventually, a space opened up at the Armadale Health Department, about a 45-minute drive away.

The Krugel family were all smiles, but endured a tumultuous 24 hours before this photo.(ABC News: Cason Ho)

“We are extremely grateful to all the staff for how they handled this whole ordeal,” Ms Krugel said.

“Even if it was really difficult, it could have been much worse.”

Hundreds of pregnant women turned away

Hospitals in the Perth metropolitan area have been forced to turn away pregnant women during times of high demand.

WA Department of Health figures show pregnant women were bypassed or diverted from Perth hospitals 311 times between June 2021 and May 2022.

In some cases, they had to travel up to an hour from St John of God Midland State Hospital to Northam Hospital, around 80 kilometers away.

Maternity bypass also occurred at Fiona Stanley Hospital, Osborne Park Hospital and Rockingham General Hospital.

A little boy is holding a book while sitting in his parents' lap on a sofa.
The family say the first year with their little boy has been great, despite how it all started.(ABC News: Cason Ho)

Ms Krugel said the ordeal had eroded her faith in the public health system.

“Just for my peace of mind, next time I’ll go private,” she said.

Ms Krugel had hoped for a natural birth, but had to undergo an emergency caesarean section, which she attributes in part to anxiety resulting from the situation.

“[The baby’s] the heartbeat was all over the place from all the stress,” she said.

An album full of photos of a little boy.
Ms Krugel says the staff involved in her work were “incredible” despite the circumstances.(ABC News: Cason Ho)

“Part of me thinks that if we hadn’t had to move the hospitals, maybe I would have been… more likely to give birth the way I wanted.”

Caesarean sections on the rise

The World Health Organization indicates that the ideal cesarean birth rate should be between 10 and 15%.

The proportion of caesarean births in Australia exceeds 30% and has been increasing for more than a decade.

In WA, it has risen from 33% in 2008 to over 40% in 2022, according to figures from the WA Department of Health.

Having an emergency C-section contributes significantly to the risk of postnatal anxiety, depression, and PTSD after childbirth.

Advocates push for midwife-led births

Consumer advocacy group Maternity Choices Australia says stressful childbirth, including bypass, can also contribute to an increased risk of postnatal mental health problems.

The advocacy group is writing a brief to the WA Minister of Health on state maternity services.

“Emotional trauma is exploding,” Vice President Azure Rigney said.

A woman smiles at the camera
Ms Rigney says WA is falling behind other states and territories in providing adequate maternity services.(ABC News: Michael Lloyd)

Ms Rigney said allowing midwife-led units to manage low-risk pregnancies would reduce the need to divert mothers to other hospitals.

“It’s like a birthing centre, a midwife-led unit where they have all the lifesaving equipment…it just means you don’t have caesarean section and medical intervention facilities,” he said. she declared.

“If there was anything very rare and complicated for a low-risk woman in this setting, what we’ve learned from COVID is that the midwife can face the obstetrician and have this specialized contribution if necessary.”

“Something has to change”: midwife

But it can be difficult to implement Ms. Rigney’s recommendations in the face of a nationwide labor shortage.

The North Metropolitan Health Service has described maternity bypass surgery as “standard operational practice” to cope with high demand.

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