Room Services – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 02:01:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hotels-benin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Room Services – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ 32 32 A conversation with Jayma Shields Spence – The Ukiah Daily Journal https://hotels-benin.com/a-conversation-with-jayma-shields-spence-the-ukiah-daily-journal/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:00:22 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/a-conversation-with-jayma-shields-spence-the-ukiah-daily-journal/ By Susan Baird Kanaan There’s a saying in Laytonville that people call Healthy Start before they call 911. It rings true because this family resource center connects residents to essential life support services, including food, mental health assistance and health insurance. The overarching goal, says coordinator Jayma Shields Spence, is to build family and community […]]]>

By Susan Baird Kanaan

There’s a saying in Laytonville that people call Healthy Start before they call 911. It rings true because this family resource center connects residents to essential life support services, including food, mental health assistance and health insurance. The overarching goal, says coordinator Jayma Shields Spence, is to build family and community resilience.

Family Resource Centers (FRCs) operate throughout California and the United States to help families locate and use needed services such as CalFresh (food stamps) and MediCal. Of the nine FRCs in Mendocino County, two are county-run; the others, including Laytonville, are independent but receive county funding. Additional funding comes from federal, state, and foundation grants, as well as donations and local events.

In a recent conversation, Jayma explained, “The family resource center is a good model because it works locally. The county sees this value and funds it. We become the community hub that connects local residents to resources available across the county and state. She added: “We FRC are brilliant at stretching a little pot of money as far as we can.”

Communities are created and recreated with the help of strong organizations and leaders, and Laytonville Healthy Start clearly plays that role for this town in the heart of the beautiful and remote Long Valley. It was formed in 1997 by a coalition between the school district, the Cahto Tribe, the Long Valley Health Center and local businesses, driven by concerns about substance abuse among local youth. The coalition continues to serve as a community advisory board and ear to the ground on local needs and resources.

Friends of the Long Valley Public Library at the Book Room.

Healthy Start is based in Harwood Hall/Memorial Park, its fiscal agent and governing body. In addition to helping people access the supports mentioned above and others, he coordinates a multitude of resources reflecting a broad understanding of community health – Laytonville Food Bank, Laytonville Skate Park, Long Valley Public Library and Community Room, Long Valley Dance and Fitness Center, and more. It was recently certified as the area’s emergency escape shelter. It’s no wonder that every year around 1,000 of the area’s 1,300 residents use one or more of its services.

Jayma Shields Spence seems made for the role of coordinator. Growing up in Laytonville and recently graduating from college, she was back home working with local teens in 2009 when her boss, Michelle Schott, asked her to take over as coordinator of Healthy Start. Within months, Jayma had stepped into Schott’s “big shoes” and was learning on the job.

Fortunately, the Mendocino County FRC network had just been formed, and their county colleagues were good sources of training, support, and mentorship. “I could lean on people,” Jayma said. Now she chairs the Network – mentoring has come full circle. At a time when many Mendocino County organizations are in transition as their founders retire, this is an encouraging achievement.

Jayma describes Laytonville Healthy Start FRC as “the community’s support and catch-all entity – a place anyone can go to meet any need.” She and her team of five, along with volunteers, tailor her services to meet the changing needs of the community, alerted by coalition partners and local residents. Over the years, beginning with a breakfast program for seniors, Jayma has expanded the programs beyond the initial focus of family building to also make Healthy Start a community resource center.

Like all leaders, she has faced the challenges of the COVID pandemic since the start of 2020. Having always relied on face-to-face contact, Healthy Start has had to be nimble to continue to respond to local needs while protecting the safety of staff and customers. They opted to keep the doors open, but with additional protections in place and more virtual service delivery, a mode that continues to this day.

Courses on healthy eating and the preparation of snacks in the summer program.
Courses on healthy eating and the preparation of snacks in the summer program.

These changes cut many programs, including a popular summer camp for children (which the school district will sponsor this year); they also undermined local fundraising. The Community Foundation’s pandemic-related grants have provided an essential lifeline, allowing Healthy Start to meet a growing demand for food assistance and family support.

When asked to comment on her organization’s impact on the community, Jayma said, “We respond to the need in the moment and oftentimes we don’t know the rest of the story. Our successes show up when people come back and tell us, and when we get calls or letters or new referrals from other members of the community. A man who was new to the area told us that he had been told that Laytonville Healthy Start was “the first place I should come”.

Regarding personal awards, Jayma said, “I’m a giver, and when I can give and help, that’s all I need to continue in this work. I also like to solve problems and am a global thinker, and change doesn’t scare me, so a lot of what we do here feeds my soul. It’s been a journey, and I feel like we’re just getting started.

Laytonville Healthy Start Family Resource Center

  • Jayma Shields Spence, Coordinator
  • 44400 Willis Ave, Laytonville
  • (707) 984-8089
  • Hours: Open MTW 9-5; available by phone Thu/F
  • Facebook: Laytonville Healthy Start Family Resource Center
  • Instagram: laytonville.healthy.start
  • laytonville.org/healthystart
  • Check donations, payable to Laytonville Healthy Start, can be mailed to PO Box 1382, Laytonville, CA 95454
Children in the summer program visit the book room, where they can choose free books.
Children in the summer program visit the book room, where they can choose free books.
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Governor Hochul announces completion of $23 million affordable housing development in Poughkeepsie https://hotels-benin.com/governor-hochul-announces-completion-of-23-million-affordable-housing-development-in-poughkeepsie/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 17:16:33 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/governor-hochul-announces-completion-of-23-million-affordable-housing-development-in-poughkeepsie/ Governor Kathy Hochul today announced the completion of a $23 million affordable housing development in the town of Poughkeepsie. Crannell Square offers 75 affordable apartments in an energy-efficient building, including 12 supportive housing units and 26 with a preference for income-eligible artists. The building, built on the site of an underutilized parking lot, is designed […]]]>

Governor Kathy Hochul today announced the completion of a $23 million affordable housing development in the town of Poughkeepsie. Crannell Square offers 75 affordable apartments in an energy-efficient building, including 12 supportive housing units and 26 with a preference for income-eligible artists. The building, built on the site of an underutilized parking lot, is designed to improve the streetscape and increase pedestrian traffic downtown.

“My administration continues to be focused on increasing the supply of affordable housing in towns like Poughkeepsie with great access to jobs, transit and services,” Governor Hochul said. “This investment in Crannell Square will facilitate a more vibrant, safe and attractive downtown while providing 75 modern, energy-efficient homes for individuals and families. By creating new affordable housing options in New York cities, we will improve the quality of life and stability for all New Yorkers.”

Crannell Square is part of Governor Hochul’s statewide plan to make housing more affordable, equitable and stable. In the recently enacted State Budget, the Governor successfully secured a new five-year, $25 billion comprehensive housing plan that will increase housing supply by creating or preserving 100,000 affordable homes in New York City, including 10,000 with support services for vulnerable populations, plus the electrification of 50,000 additional homes.

The development consists of a single four-storey building in the historic Upper Mill Street area of ​​Poughkeepsie. Crannell Square is designed to recreate the historic front porch design that is prevalent in the surrounding neighborhood and encourage pedestrian traffic along Mill Street. The development includes a new pedestrian plaza with benches and landscaping on the northeast corner of the site which follows the original Crannell Street path.

The 75 apartments include a mix of one-, two-, and three-bedroom units that are affordable for households with an income at or below 100% of the region’s median income.

Five apartments are reserved for people with mental health needs and seven apartments are reserved for people with physical disabilities. These residents will have access to on-site support services provided by Hudson River Housing. There is an apartment for a superintendent on site.

The building was designed to meet the standards of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s Low-Rise New Construction program and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification. Energy efficiency measures include high-efficiency HVAC and domestic hot water systems, high-performance spray foam insulation, and Energy STAR windows and appliances. The building is EPA Energy STAR Homes v3.1 certified and EPA Indoor airPLUS certified.

Residential facilities include a community hall, laundry room, pedestrian plaza, co-working space, tenant lounge, and indoor and outdoor bike storage.

Crannell Square is located within walking distance of Poughkeepsie Metro-North and Amtrak Station, Walkway Over the Hudson, Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center, Poughkeepsie Public Library, City Hall and County Offices of Dutchess, as well as the historic Bardavon Opera House.

The project developers are Kearney Realty and Development Group, Inc. and Hudson River Housing.

State funding for development included federal and state low-income housing tax credits that generated $11.5 million in equity and $1.7 million in grant from of New York State Homes and Community Renewal. The site was successfully remediated under the Department of Environmental Conservation’s brownfields cleanup program and became eligible for $2.9 million in tax credits upon project completion. NYSERDA provided $65,000 in support under the Low Rise New Construction Program. The Community Preservation Corporation provided $12 million in construction funding, as well as $5.5 million in permanent funding through its partnership with the New York State Common Retirement Fund. Dutchess County received $500,000 in HOME funds.

In the 2022-23 state budget, Governor Hochul extended and expanded New York State’s thriving brownfields cleanup program, which was set to expire in December 2022. The program is reauthorized for 10 years. The budget improves the PCA by encouraging cleanups in disadvantaged communities. Additionally, the program reaffirms Governor Hochul’s commitment to affordable housing development by expanding the universe of affordable housing programs eligible for BCP property tax credits, providing critical benefits to incentivize brownfield redevelopment as as much-needed affordable housing. In addition, BCP is now encouraging the development of select renewable energy facility sites, with new tax credits, to help focus BCP-focused redevelopment and meet the state’s ambitious climate goals.

New York State Homes and Community Renewal Commissioner RuthAnne Visnauskas said: “As Poughkeepsie’s economy grows and attracts new residents, we need to ensure there is affordable housing to protect long-time residents, families and people with special needs from displacement. This investment $23 million will bring 75 new apartments to the Upper Mill Street neighborhood and help foster a more walkable and welcoming downtown, while enhancing the city’s thriving arts community.We are thrilled to partner again with Kearney Realty and Hudson River Housing for another successful development.

Doreen M. Harris, President and CEO of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, said: “With the completion of the Crannell Square project, residents of the Poughkeepsie area will now have increased access to affordable housing that provides an energy-efficient, healthy and comfortable living environment with a low carbon footprint. New York State Energy Research and Development Authority is proud to support projects like this as they advance Governor Hochul’s commitment to achieve two million climate-friendly homes with a focus on equity to ensure that all New -Yorkers benefit from investments in clean energy.”

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said: “The Department of Environmental Conservation is proud to help bring affordable housing to Poughkeepsie and to continue to work under Governor Hochul’s leadership to revitalize and clean up communities across the state. This is what the New York’s brownfields cleanup program strives to accomplish and we thank Homes and Community Renewal and local communities throughout the region who are working to restore and redevelop underutilized properties to benefit the Valley of the River. ‘Hudson and all New Yorkers.’

State Senator Sue Serino said: “The completion of this incredible project couldn’t come at a better time as our community is in dire need of high quality, affordable housing. We are grateful to Kearney Realty and Development Group, Inc. and Hudson River Housing for making such a strong investment in the town of Poughkeepsie and for their commitment to ensuring our neighbors have access to such a unique local space.”

Assemblyman Jonathan Jacobson said: “This is a great example of public-private partnership and shows the Kearney Group’s commitment to providing quality, affordable housing in the town of Poughkeepsie.”

Poughkeepsie Mayor Rob Rolison said: “The city is delighted that this project has come to fruition. We have a huge need for affordable housing in the city, and Crannell Square has a great mix of housing units that are bringing activity to this area and will boost business. nearby. as well.”

Hudson River Housing Executive Director Christa Hines said: “Hudson River Housing believes that affordable housing is the essential foundation of thriving communities that provide opportunity for all. Our home is the base from which we can all realize our full potential. Yet too many Poughkeepsie residents are struggling to maintain this base, especially as housing costs continue to rise. We are proud to be part of bringing Crannell Square to fruition as an important step in ensuring long-term affordability in the town of Poughkeepsie.

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said“Real estate investments have provided a strong return to the state pension fund and benefited many areas of upstate New York. We are proud that the state pension fund can help revitalize New York’s communities and to provide much-needed affordable housing to those in need.”

Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro said: “With the rising cost of living in our area and country, it is more important than ever to have more affordable housing in Dutchess County and the Town of Poughkeepsie. These apartments will help support local families, artists and those who live with challenges such as physical We are grateful to have this beautiful new building in our county seat and to Kearney Realty and Development Group, Inc., and Hudson River Housing for their commitment to improving the neighborhood .

Community Preservation Corporation Senior Vice President and Regional Director Doug Olcott said: “We are proud to have been able to help fund another project with our longtime partners at Kearney Realty to help continue the revitalization of the Poughkeepsie community. The transformation of this lot from a parking lot and former brownfield industrial into a beautiful, energy-efficient building is something we should all be proud of Crannell Square will be a vital source of quality affordable housing that will provide a safe and supportive environment for its tenants, and will be an anchor stability for the community I would like to thank Ken and Sean Kearney, Hudson River Housing, Governor Hochul and her team at UNHCR, and Comptroller DiNapoli and our lending partners at the State Pension Fund for their support.”

Kearney Realty and Development Group President Ken Kearney said: “Crannell Square is another successful example of New York State’s innovative middle-income housing program. Once an underutilized parking lot, it is now home to a vibrant mixed-income community. We are so proud to bring this dynamic development at the Town of Poughkeepsie, and we are grateful to our partners who have helped bring this development to fruition; New York State Homes and Community Renewal; New York State Department of Environmental Conservation; The Town of Poughkeepsie; and the Dutchess County Planning Department . »

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Cramer says investors can buy shares of this software company as a speculative choice https://hotels-benin.com/cramer-says-investors-can-buy-shares-of-this-software-company-as-a-speculative-choice/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:04:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/cramer-says-investors-can-buy-shares-of-this-software-company-as-a-speculative-choice/ CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Monday that investors had his permission to buy shares of software company Mitek Systems on a speculative basis. “Mitek is really cheap on an earnings basis, which is why it’s… the one I’m willing to bless for speculation in what is otherwise an extremely hostile environment,” said the “Mad Money” […]]]>

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on Monday that investors had his permission to buy shares of software company Mitek Systems on a speculative basis.

“Mitek is really cheap on an earnings basis, which is why it’s… the one I’m willing to bless for speculation in what is otherwise an extremely hostile environment,” said the “Mad Money” host.

“I think these guys made a ton of smart decisions and business is good,” he said of the company, which offers digital identity verification and credit deposit services. mobile checks.

To illustrate his point about the fintech industry, Cramer noted that other companies in the sector such as Affirm and Block have been crushed by the market well below their highs.

He also mentioned that Mitek is involved in a lawsuit seeking a court ruling that its technology does not infringe the United Services Automobile Association’s mobile banking patents. The tiff regarding the latter’s patents has been going on for several years, according to Reuters.

Still, Cramer said the company has delivered strong performance in its past quarters and made acquisitions over the past two years that set it apart from other pandemic winners.

Shares of Mitek are down 52% year-to-date and hit a new 52-week low on Monday.

“Just leave room to buy more into the weakness, because we have no idea when it will stop falling, just like we have no idea about the rest of the market,” Cramer said. “It’s neither worse nor better.”

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The Day – Municipal Meetings https://hotels-benin.com/the-day-municipal-meetings/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:49:50 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/the-day-municipal-meetings/ East of Lyme Monday — Commission on Aging, 5 p.m., Senior Center, Dining Room; Harbor Shellfish Management Commission, 7 p.m., City Hall. Tuesday — Parks and Recreation Commission, 7 p.m., McCook Point Park; Planning Commission, 7 p.m., City Hall, Upper Level Conference Room. Thursday — Municipal Construction Committee, 6 p.m., Town Hall; Waterford-East Lyme Shellfish […]]]>

East of Lyme

Monday — Commission on Aging, 5 p.m., Senior Center, Dining Room; Harbor Shellfish Management Commission, 7 p.m., City Hall.

Tuesday — Parks and Recreation Commission, 7 p.m., McCook Point Park; Planning Commission, 7 p.m., City Hall, Upper Level Conference Room.

Thursday — Municipal Construction Committee, 6 p.m., Town Hall; Waterford-East Lyme Shellfish Commission, 7 p.m., East Lyme Town Hall; Planning Commission, 7:30 p.m., Town Hall.

Town of Groton

Wednesday — Groton Utilities Commission, 10:30 a.m., Municipal Building, Council Chambers; Minor Façade Improvement Grant Information Session, 6 p.m., via Zoom, access at bit.ly/gtmfigis22.

Thursday — Police and Community Together Committee, 6 p.m., municipal building, council chambers.

Town of Groton

Virtual meeting information will be provided at agendasuite.org/iip/groton under the meeting you wish to view/attend at least 24 hours prior to the meeting. City Council, Committee of the Whole and Representative City Assembly meetings will be broadcast live on GMTV and YouTube.

Monday — Beautification Committee, 5:30 p.m., Town Hall Annex, Community Hall 2/virtual; Golf Advisory Council, 7 p.m., virtual via Zoom.

Tuesday — Planning and Zoning Commission, 7 p.m., City Hall Annex, Community Hall 2/virtual; City Council Committee of the Whole, 6:30 p.m., Thrive 55+ Active Living Centre/virtual; Water Pollution Control Authority, 5:30 p.m., City Hall Annex, Community Room 1/Virtual.

Wednesday — Community Development Advisory Committee, noon, Town Hall Annex, Community Room 3/Virtual; Inland Wetlands Agency Special Meeting – Site Visit, 3:30 p.m., 375 Drozdyk Drive; Property Reuse Committee Special Meeting, 5:30 p.m., Zoom; Planning and Zoning Commission, 6 p.m., City Hall Annex, Community Hall 1/virtual; Library Council, 4 p.m., Groton Public Library.

Thursday—School Building Standing Committee, 6 p.m., City Hall Annex, Community Room 2/Virtual; Trail Coordination Working Group, 4 p.m., Thrive 55+ Active Living Center/virtual.

Ledyard

Virtual access details available at ledyardct.org.

Monday — Public Security Commission, 3:30 p.m., City Hall Annex.

Tuesday — Cemetery Committee, 4 p.m., City Hall Annex/virtual; Conservation Committee, 6:45 p.m., Town Hall Annex/virtual.

Wednesday — Finance Committee, 5 p.m., Town Hall Annex/virtual; Briefing on the proposed solid waste management facility on the Dow property at Gales Ferry, 6:30 p.m., Bill Library/virtual; Community Relations Committee, 6:30 p.m., Town Hall Annex/virtual.

Lyme

Monday — Sustainable Development Committee, 10 a.m., town hall; Planning and zoning commission, 7 p.m., town hall.

Wednesday — Special Board of Education Meeting, 6:30 p.m., Center School, 49 Lyme St., Old Lyme, Board of Education Conference Room.

Thursday — Zoning Appeal Board Public Hearing, 7:30 p.m., Town Hall.

Montville

Tuesday — Conservation Commission, 6 p.m., City Hall, Room 102.

Wednesday — Parks and Recreation Commission, 6:30 p.m., City Hall, Council Chambers.

Thursday — City Council Public Hearing, 6 p.m., City Hall, Council Chambers; Inland Wetlands Commission, 6 p.m., Town Hall, Room 203; Ad-hoc COVID-19 Impact Study Committee, 6:30 p.m., Town Hall, Council Chambers; City Council, 7 p.m., town hall, council chamber.

New London

For more details on remote access, visit newlondonct.org.

Thursday — Parking Authority, 5:30 p.m., teleconference; Planning and Zoning Commission, 7 p.m., City Hall, Council Chambers.

North of Stonington

Virtual access details available at northstoningtonct.gov.

Monday—Hewitt Farm Committee, 4:30 p.m., New City Hall, Boardroom.

Tuesday—Board of Selectmen, 6:30 p.m., North Stonington Education Center, Room 1.

Wednesday — Special Traffic Commission Subcommittee Meeting, 11 a.m., Zoom. ; Finance Council, 7 p.m., North Stonington Education Center, Room 1.

Thursday – Juvenile Review Board, 2 p.m., North Stonington Grange; Conservation Commission, 6 p.m., North Stonington Education Center, Room 1.

Norwich

Monday — Ethics Commission, 5 p.m., Town Hall; Ad hoc tennis committee, 5:30 p.m., Recreation Department.

Tuesday — Rehabilitation Review Board, 9 a.m., 23 Union St.; School Board, 5:30 p.m., Kelly Middle School; Zoning Appeal Board, 7 p.m., City Hall.

Wednesday — Historic District Commission, 5:30 p.m., City Hall; Golf Course Authority, 6 p.m., Norwich Golf Course.

Thursday — Commission on Inland Wetlands, Watercourses and Their Conservation, 7 p.m., Town Hall.

Old Lyme

Monday — Solid Waste and Recycling Committee, 6 p.m., Town Hall, Mezzanine Boardroom; Planning Commission, 6:30 p.m., Town Hall, Meeting Room.

Tuesday — Port Management Commission, 7 p.m., City Hall, Mezzanine Conference Room; Water Pollution Control Authority, 7:30 p.m., Town Hall, Meeting room.

Wednesday — Affordable Housing Commission, 5 p.m., City Hall, meeting room; Special School Board Meeting, 6:30 p.m., Center School, 49 Lyme St., Old Lyme, School Board Conference Room.

Thursday — Assessors’ meeting, 9:00 a.m., Town Hall, Mezzanine Conference Room; Shoreline Gateway Committee, 4 p.m., 2nd Floor Mezzanine Conference Room; Tree Commission, 4 p.m., Town Hall, meeting room; Zoning Appeal Commission, 6:30 p.m., town hall, meeting room.

Preston

Web conference details are available at preston-ct.org.

Monday – Housing Authority, 4 p.m., Lincoln Park.

Tuesday — Library Board, 6:30 p.m., web conference.

Wednesday — Youth Services Advisory Council, 4:30 p.m., City Hall; Finance Council, 7:30 p.m., Preston Plains Middle School.

stonington

Monday – Architectural Design Review Board, 6 p.m., Pawcatuck Middle School; Port of Stonington Management Commission, 7 p.m., police station.

Tuesday — Economic Development Commission, 6 p.m., Pawcatuck Middle School; Zoning Appeal Board, 7 p.m., police station; Facilities Committee, 7 p.m., Social Services Building.

Thursday – Climate Change Task Force, 5:15 p.m., Milne Center for Ocean Science and Conservation, Mystic Aquarium.

Waterford

Virtual access details available at waterfordct.org.

Tuesday — Design Review Board, 4 p.m., virtual via Zoom; Special meeting of the Economic Development Commission, 5 p.m., City Hall; Waterford Utility Commission, 6 p.m., Civic Complex; Planning and Zoning Commission, 6:30 p.m., City Hall, Auditorium.

Wednesday — Information Technology Meeting, 2:30 p.m., City Hall, Appleby Room.

Thursday — Long-term financial planning, 5:30 p.m., Town Hall.

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Disney+ battles rivals in the Middle East streaming market https://hotels-benin.com/disney-battles-rivals-in-the-middle-east-streaming-market/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/disney-battles-rivals-in-the-middle-east-streaming-market/ A smartphone with the ‘Disney’ logo displayed is seen on the keyboard in front of the words ‘Streaming Service’ displayed in this illustration taken March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/File Photo/File Photo Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register DUBAI, June 9 (Reuters) – Disney+ (DIS.N) launched its steam streaming service in the Middle […]]]>

A smartphone with the ‘Disney’ logo displayed is seen on the keyboard in front of the words ‘Streaming Service’ displayed in this illustration taken March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/File Photo/File Photo

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

DUBAI, June 9 (Reuters) – Disney+ (DIS.N) launched its steam streaming service in the Middle East and North Africa on Wednesday, vying for market share in a region with a young but sparse population. people are using such services so far.

Disney+ said it went live in 16 Arab countries and was tailoring content to the region, including offering Arabic subtitles on most offerings, especially popular content.

Netflix currently leads the region, with more than 6.8 million subscribers, according to Digital TV Research. Starzplay, an Abu Dhabi-based competitor, ranks second with just under 2 million, followed by Amazon with 1.4 million.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Some competitors offer original content in Arabic. Netflix is ​​already working on the second seasons of its popular series “Al Rawabi School for Girls” and “Finding Ola”.

MBC Group’s streaming platform Shahid has ordered an Arabic version of British comedy “The Office”. Regional competitor OSN has an Arabic version of the American legal series “Suits”.

OSN previously had the rights to stream Disney+ original content.

Starzplay is also working on original Arabic content, its CEO Maaz Sheikh told Reuters last week. He said the region had plenty of room for growth, as streaming penetration was 10%.

Digital TV Research predicts that Netflix will increase its base to 11 million by 2027 and Disney+ will then take second place with nearly 6.5 million. Amazon is expected to reach 4.8 million subscribers by 2027 and Starzplay just under 3 million.

At a Disney+ pre-launch event at Dubai Opera, Egyptian director Mohamed Diab of Marvel Studios’ “Moon Knight” was promoting the original superhero series, which is making its regional debut. .

His wife, Sarah Goher, was also a producer on the series, which features ancient Egyptian gods.

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Reporting by Yousef Saba; Editing by Bradley Perrett

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Where do bipartisan efforts on mental health legislation stand after the Texas shooting? https://hotels-benin.com/where-do-bipartisan-efforts-on-mental-health-legislation-stand-after-the-texas-shooting/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 09:25:41 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/where-do-bipartisan-efforts-on-mental-health-legislation-stand-after-the-texas-shooting/ A recent spate of mass shootings, including an attack at a Texas elementary school that killed 19 young children and two teachers, has thrust the issue of mental health back into the national spotlight. “There is a serious mental health crisis among young people in this country.” President Joe Biden said last week in a […]]]>

A recent spate of mass shootings, including an attack at a Texas elementary school that killed 19 young children and two teachers, has thrust the issue of mental health back into the national spotlight.

“There is a serious mental health crisis among young people in this country.” President Joe Biden said last week in a primetime speech on gun violence, in which he called for an assault weapons ban and other reforms as lawmakers try to find a way forward. compromise. “We have to do something about it.”

What is needed, he said, are more school counselors and nurses, additional mental health services for students and teachers and more resources to help protect children from media harm. social.

“It’s important,” Biden said. “I just told you what I would do. The question now is what will Congress do?”

President Joe Biden speaks about the recent mass shootings and urges Congress to pass laws to address gun violence at the Cross Hall of the White House in Washington, June 2, 2022.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

A bipartisan group of senators, led by Democrat Chris Murphy and Republican John Cornyn, is considering a package of gun reforms that would include funding for mental health. Negotiations are ongoing, with Murphy saying he is ‘more confident than ever’ that a compromise can be reached, but Democrats need 10 Republican senators to approve any gun legislation to overcome the 60-year filibuster room voice.

While those gun talks remain up in the air, several congressional committees have been laying the groundwork for months on bipartisan packages to improve mental health services and tackle addiction after the coronavirus pandemic put highlight the need for increased access to care.

The Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) and the Senate Finance Committee set a goal in February to present comprehensive legislation this summer, although the two committees have not yet published more detailed schedule.

The Senate Finance Committee released its first set of draft policies related to telehealth services on May 26, and said additional draft policies may be released in the coming weeks.

Also in May, the House Energy and Commerce Committee proposed a package that would reauthorize more than 30 mental health and addiction programs that would expire this fall. The legislation, titled Restoring Hope for Mental Health and Well-Being Act of 2022, has been introduced in the House but has yet to come to a full vote.

Chuck Ingoglia, president and CEO of the National Council for Welfare, said that in his 20 years of advocacy, he had never seen Congress devote “so much time, energy and attention to mental health issues.

“I’m confident that a bill will pass this year,” Ingoglia told ABC News. “And then the second question, which is really important, is what is its extent or size?”

Sarah Corcoran, vice president of government relations at Guide Consulting Services, said a package “would have to be substantial enough to really transform the system from where we are to where it needs to be to meet the current level of needs. “.

Late last year, several organizations representing child health professionals declared a national youth mental health emergency. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also reported that ER visits for suicide attempts among teenage girls increased by more than 50% at the start of the pandemic. US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy told the Senate Finance Committee during a hearing earlier this year that the pandemic has had a “devastating” impact on the mental health of young Americans.

In this Feb. 8, 2022, file photo, from right, President Ron Wyden, Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy, Sen. Chuck Grassley and Ranking Member Sen. Mike Crapo speak before the hearing of the Senate Finance Committee titled Protecting Youth Mental Health: Part I – A Notice and a Call to Action.

Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images, FILE

Many of the proposals discussed by the Senate and House panels cover what lawmakers focused on in the wake of the Uvalde shooting: youth mental health and school services.

Republicans in particular have favored measures such as mental health funding and increased school safety as talks of possible gun control reforms continue on Capitol Hill, though supporters say that the rhetoric blaming the shootings solely on mental illness is harmful and inaccurate.

Democratic Senator Patty Murray, chair of the HELP committee, said she wanted the package to help “schools and communities meet the mental health needs of children”.

Other priorities Murray outlined at a hearing in March include screening and preventing suicide, reducing drug overdose deaths and addressing the mental health needs of new mothers.

The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden, has identified five areas requiring potential legislative action, including strengthening mental health care for children and youth, expanding telehealth services and strengthening the behavioral health workforce. Republican and Democratic members of the panel teamed up to address each area.

Draft policies released last week would remove Medicare’s in-person requirement for those seeking mental health treatment by phone or virtual health and encourage states to use their Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to better addressing behavioral health needs in schools through telehealth – a step that could bring relief to those living in mental health deserts. An ABC analysis found that 75% of rural counties nationwide have no mental health providers, or less than 50 providers per 100,000 people.

President Ron Wyden, D-Ore., tweeted days after Uvalde’s shooting that it was “high time for a comprehensive approach to addressing the mental health crisis.”

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Cousin of slain Apollo woman found at U-Haul facility works to help those suffering from abuse https://hotels-benin.com/cousin-of-slain-apollo-woman-found-at-u-haul-facility-works-to-help-those-suffering-from-abuse/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 09:01:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/cousin-of-slain-apollo-woman-found-at-u-haul-facility-works-to-help-those-suffering-from-abuse/ A survivor of domestic and sexual abuse offers her decorating skills to help other victims find comfort after fleeing their abusers. Jennifer Zimmerman, 52, from Wexford, said she escaped years of mental and physical domestic abuse. Today, she’s focusing her styling skills to transform seven rooms at the South Side Victims Center into fully decorated […]]]>

A survivor of domestic and sexual abuse offers her decorating skills to help other victims find comfort after fleeing their abusers.

Jennifer Zimmerman, 52, from Wexford, said she escaped years of mental and physical domestic abuse.

Today, she’s focusing her styling skills to transform seven rooms at the South Side Victims Center into fully decorated and inviting rooms, complete with plush bedding, lighting, and homey touches such as artwork and blankets to create “safe spaces” for men. , women and children.

Zimmerman is still reeling from the death of his cousin, Apollo’s Kelly Steele, who was found fatally shot last month in a storage unit at a U-Haul facility in Lower Burrell. Police charged Steele’s husband, Alfred, with homicide.

Determined to honor her cousin’s memory, Zimmerman paints shelter rooms inside the Victim Center blue, Kelly’s favorite color.

“I want them to be sanctuaries and a place of healing,” Zimmerman said. “We will work to honor Kelly in all future projects.

“My goal is to create safe spaces. Safe spaces for people to share their stories and safe places to rest. I want to break the stigma of staying in a shelter.

The flooring, donated by 84 Lumber, will be installed and the finished rooms will provide a warm and private environment for shelter residents.

Mikayla Marie Steele, Kelly’s mother-in-law, described Zimmerman’s outreach as “brilliant”.

“I think it’s a beautiful way to remember Kelly. Blue was her favorite color – it reminded her of the ocean, which she thought was peaceful. If only that was all her life was, but I hope that others will find safety in these shelters,” said Mikayla Steele.

Courtesy of Jennifer Zimmerman

A safe room decorated by domestic violence survivor and lawyer Jennifer Zimmerman from Wexford.

Zimmerman, interior designer at Newt & Ruby Interiors in Wexford, said it was time to change the stereotypical images that can be imagined in a refuge.

Describing her styles as curated with a mix of old and new, Zimmerman launched her program called Rise last fall.

To date, individual donors and Washington County-based national retailers Tuesday Morning and 84 Lumber have donated to Rise.

Blankets are a staple, Zimmerman said.

“They represent safety simply because of the weight and smell of a clean blanket,” she said. “There’s a reason I think they call it a security blanket.”

More silence

Zimmerman wants those living in fear to know that she has their back.

“We keep it quiet and we don’t use our voices. There was a time when I needed to use these services, but I wasn’t scared because I didn’t know what to expect when I arrived,” Zimmerman said. “I will be your voice.”

The Center for Victims is billed as the largest and most comprehensive service and advocacy provider for victims of all crimes in Pennsylvania. To date, the organization has helped more than 100,000 people through outreach and outreach events and programs throughout Allegheny County, according to its website.

Darnell Drewery, 50, is a trauma education and wellness facilitator at the facility. He said the typical shelter room lacks the level of decor that Zimmerman will provide.

“Sensory stimulation is a big part of healing,” Drewery said. “That immediate gratification is an important place where someone feels welcome and safe. It’s a big part of our journey in the shelter.

For security reasons and to protect the identity of the victims, the tribe was not allowed inside the shelter.

From fear to faith

Zimmerman grew up in Apollo and graduated from Apollo-Ridge High School.

She said she was repeatedly raped by multiple men on the Indiana University campus in Pennsylvania during her freshman year in the 1980s.

Zimmerman did not report the sexual assaults.

“I never followed up on charges because my life was in danger and I felt fear and shame,” she said.

She dropped out of college at 18, eventually told her parents what happened and said she had lived in fear, shame and guilt for decades caught in a cycle of abuse .

“There is such redemption in this story because I was repeatedly asked to go back and speak to the IUP,” Zimmerman said.

Zimmerman is scheduled to speak about domestic and sexual abuse at the IUP this fall.

“I want people to experience the healing that I experienced,” she said.

Zimmerman said she credits God for her recovery, worshiping at Petra International Ministries in Penn Hills and A Remnant of People Ministries in Homestead.

Encouraging victims of abuse to share their story and begin the healing process, from the comfort of an inviting space, is rewarding, she said.

The feedback has been “magnificent,” Zimmerman said.

“It’s absolutely my mission,” she said.

Joyce Hanz is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Joyce at 724-226-7725, jhanz@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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The injection room not only saved lives, it also protected clients from violence https://hotels-benin.com/the-injection-room-not-only-saved-lives-it-also-protected-clients-from-violence/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 02:01:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/the-injection-room-not-only-saved-lives-it-also-protected-clients-from-violence/ With no drug overdose deaths on its premises in its 20 years of operation, Sydney’s only medically assisted drug injecting room has done what it foresaw saving the lives of more than 10,600 people who overdosed on the premises. The latest research from UNSW Sydney and the University of Western Sydney has uncovered another key […]]]>

With no drug overdose deaths on its premises in its 20 years of operation, Sydney’s only medically assisted drug injecting room has done what it foresaw saving the lives of more than 10,600 people who overdosed on the premises.

The latest research from UNSW Sydney and the University of Western Sydney has uncovered another key health benefit for people using the Medically Supervised Injection Center (MSIC): refuge from violence.

In a study published in the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, criminologist George ‘Kev’ Dertadian of UNSW Law & Justice interviewed 20 men who regularly used the Kings Cross injecting room to safely manage their opioid or amphetamine habits safely.

“Previous research has already shown that the Center for Medically Supervised Injection has made people’s lives healthier in other ways, whether it’s reducing drug use, accessing treatment services, or to connect to other forms of social services,” Dr Dertadian said.

“But what emerges from our latest research is that this service deals with people whose lives are very marginalized and precarious, and that it acts as a kind of refuge from the forms of harassment and violence that they undergo daily outside the center. base.”

Dr. Dertadian said respondents explicitly described MSIC as a place where their health and drug use became safer, which, by extension, made their lives more manageable. In the case of 18-year-old Yasim, visiting the MSIC was a better option than injecting drugs on the street because it allowed him to let his guard down because “you don’t have to look over your shoulder every two minutes”.

Of the men aged 18 to 35 who participated in the research, all had experienced violence and abuse related to their drug use from other family members, other people who use and sell drugs, the police and the public.

Eight of the 20 men interviewed had spent time in jail, and researchers say stressful stories of traumatic abuse were a common theme.

Inside the medically supervised injection center at Kings Cross. Photo: Union MSIC

Roaming

All of the men interviewed said they had slept rough on several occasions, with some claiming it was permanent accommodation. With around a quarter of them growing up or living in western Sydney, the longer distances to get to the MSIC have contributed to the men’s decision to sleep outdoors near the centre. Underfunded city center housing services were routinely unable to house the men.

Chris, 35, told researchers: ‘When I got out of prison I may have crossed Matthew Talbot [local homeless shelter], like anywhere that takes you I will go. If they don’t take you, I sleep on the street.

One of the additional risks of sleeping outdoors is exposure to the elements as well as unprovoked violence. But even couch surfing had its own dangers, as Aaron, 35, recalls.

“As if I lived in this house. It was absolute misery. I had lost 15 kilos. I didn’t feel at all safe to eat in there. I thought I was going to get sick.

Violence towards people who inject drugs can also come from men’s family and friends and be a major reason why returning home was not an option for some. Yasim has spoken of the backlash from those close to him when they found out he was injecting.

“I had two of my cousins [almost] whip me to death because they saw these [track] marks and all that… They grabbed me then hit me, kept yelling at me, yelling at me, slapping me. Then it got to a stage where they just rockin’ their shirts [at me]and it was a real great royal rumble.

A man prepares to draw injection drugs into a syringe while someone watches

Clients said MSIC was a better option than injecting drugs on the street because “you don’t have to look over your shoulder every two minutes.” Photo: Union MSIC

The drug market

The act of buying drugs was also fraught with danger, and with poor communities under constant threat of arrest, they were unable to report any personal victimization due to fear of exposure. to unsympathetic police, creating the conditions in which violence thrives in the drug market. .

Many men said that even when buying drugs from people they considered friends, there was a risk of a violent altercation. Zane (35) said he asked a ‘so-called pal’ to help out a friend from Orange who had just arrived in Sydney, only to hear his pal had used him as a chance to rob his friend . And Mark (33) described an associate living in a shared house which he visits at least once a week.

“Every time I go there, there are incidents. People were stabbed, punched, kicked. It’s always a problem there.

Craig (35) thought it was inevitable that violence “falls your way” in the drugs scene, while Aaron said he saw “dealers here like being beaten up, and people trying to take them away their drugs.

Police brutality

Another factor that contributed to the choice to sleep rough was a desire to limit contact with police when traveling to and from the MSIC. The frequency and intensity of police harassment was widely discussed by participants.

Paul (32) described being targeted by police as he went about his business.

“They started frisking us and then they started talking aggressively and stuff, man. Like, ‘What’s your name?’, ‘Are you sure you’re not on drugs, man?’, ‘What you doing with that guy?’, you know? ‘Where did you get that, mate?’, ‘That’s better your name, mate’, ‘I know you got drugs’.”

Bill (34) spoke of pure and simple and unprovoked aggression.

“Well, once I was in town, and the police officer said, ‘you’re resisting arrest,’ he threw me headfirst into the back of the paddy wagon, looked this way, looked this way and made sure no one was there, no one was there, [so he] grabbed me, punched me in the face and said, “This is an assault on a policeman. So explain that. He punched me in the face and then accused me of assaulting a police officer.

Mark (33) received particularly rough treatment when he was unloaded from a police wagon.

“Then I was handcuffed and dragged out the back of the paddy wagon by one foot. But my handcuffs were tied behind my back. So imagine doing that, getting out of the paddy wagon and just like literally smashing my tailbone on the concrete at a meter and a half… like I had bruises on my arms, everything.

Dr Dertadian said that while many interviewees offered surprisingly sympathetic accounts of the officers and their difficult duties, allegations of police brutality appeared to be common.

“The injection center does, however, have the support of senior government and police officials, which means it is agreed that officers do not enter the center itself,” he said.

“So in this way, the center acts as a much-needed place of safety, away from the police harassment and violence they experience outside of its protective walls.”

Public harassment

Researchers were somewhat taken aback by the widely reported occurrence of public abuse, or as 23-year-old Ross describes it, “hits on the street.” This included hostility in and around local businesses from vendors and security personnel.

“People target you because you’re homeless or because you look a certain way, or because you use drugs, or because they think you’re a junkie. It’s actually happened to me quite a bit,” Bill told researchers.

James (32) described being refused use of a company toilet.

“I had spilled ice cream on my hands while eating. I just wanted to go use their bathroom. Anyway, she just said to me: ‘no, no, get out’. Then she said, ‘no junkies here’. I said I just wanted to wash my hands.

Dr Dertadian said forms of harassment by the public were so common that they were considered unavoidable.

“Although we know that people who inject drugs are very marginalized in society, which means they could be vulnerable to abuse, I was surprised at how common it was for participants to be abused by complete strangers. Imagine trying to get some rest at night only to have a random guy in an expensive suit tell you you’re a scum. It’s an ugly view of how we treat the most vulnerable in our society.

More injection rooms

Dr Dertadian and his colleagues have previously called for an increase in the number of safe injection rooms in Sydney which could help drug users living in the suburbs.

Although this research focused on the experiences of men, the findings are likely to be applicable and perhaps even more intense for women, transgender people, and gender-diverse customers. Further research is essential to understand how differing gender experiences among clients impact safety in the public space, the drug market and in contact with the police, according to the researchers.

]]> President Biden announces the fourth mission of the Operation Fly formula https://hotels-benin.com/president-biden-announces-the-fourth-mission-of-the-operation-fly-formula/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 17:29:49 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/president-biden-announces-the-fourth-mission-of-the-operation-fly-formula/ The Biden administration will facilitate air shipment of approximately 4.6 million 8-ounce bottle equivalents of Bubs Australia infant formula. Additional deliveries will follow. Today, President Biden announces that his administration is providing two flights, facilitated by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), for Operation Fly Formula to transport Bubs Australia infant formula […]]]>

The Biden administration will facilitate air shipment of approximately 4.6 million 8-ounce bottle equivalents of Bubs Australia infant formula. Additional deliveries will follow.

Today, President Biden announces that his administration is providing two flights, facilitated by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), for Operation Fly Formula to transport Bubs Australia infant formula from Melbourne, Australia, Pennsylvania and California on June 9 and June 11 respectively. This delivery will include 380,000 pounds of Bubs Australia infant formula, or approximately 4.6 million 8-ounce bottles. Further deliveries of Bubs Australia infant formula will be announced in the coming days.

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that the agency was exercising its discretion so that Bubs Australia could export infant formula. As part of this increased flexibility, Bubs Australia plans to export enough powdered formula to the United States to produce 27.5 million 8-ounce bottle equivalents of several varieties of its infant formula, including Bubs Organic Infant Formula S1, Bubs Organic Follow On Formula S2, Bubs Supreme Infant Formula, Supreme Follow On Formula, Bubs S1 Goat Milk Infant Formula and Bubs S2 Goat Milk Follow On Formula.

President Biden launched Operation Fly Formula to expedite the importation of infant formula and start getting more formula to stores as soon as possible. Under Operation Fly Formula, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are authorized to operate commercial aircraft under contract with the Department of Defense (DOD ) to pick up overseas infant formula that meets U.S. health and safety standards. standards, so it can get to store shelves faster. Earlier today, the President announced a third Operation Fly Formula mission to airship approximately 3.7 million 8-ounce equivalents of Kendamil infant formula,

In addition, the Biden administration has taken a number of other important steps to ensure there is enough safe infant formula for families, including invoking the Defense Production Act, entering into a consent agreement between the FDA to reopen Abbott Nutrition’s facility in Sturgis and issuing guidelines to the FDA so that major formula manufacturers can safely import formulas that are not currently produced for the US market.

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Texas school shooting: 9-year-old says he escaped through window as anger mounts over law enforcement response https://hotels-benin.com/texas-school-shooting-9-year-old-says-he-escaped-through-window-as-anger-mounts-over-law-enforcement-response/ Mon, 30 May 2022 08:19:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/texas-school-shooting-9-year-old-says-he-escaped-through-window-as-anger-mounts-over-law-enforcement-response/ Daniel, 9, alongside his mother, Briana Ruiz, told CNN the shooter fired multiple shots into his classroom at Robb Elementary after he was unable to enter. The door had been locked by his teacher and the bullets fired hit the teacher and a classmate. Daniel began “hiding under a table next to the wall” and […]]]>

Daniel, 9, alongside his mother, Briana Ruiz, told CNN the shooter fired multiple shots into his classroom at Robb Elementary after he was unable to enter. The door had been locked by his teacher and the bullets fired hit the teacher and a classmate.

Daniel began “hiding under a table next to the wall” and said he could see the shooter through the door window.

“I could still see his face,” he said. “I could see him staring at the people in front of me.”

Later, Daniel climbed out of a broken window to escape, cutting his hand on glass, he said, and the two injured people in his class would survive. However, his cousin, Ellie Garcia, was in a different class and was one of 19 children and two teachers killed in the shooting.
The Texas Department of Public Safety has a timeline for Tuesday’s shooting, showing the shooter was in a classroom with students for more than an hour before being shot by a tactical response team from border patrol. Still, questions remain about whether the law enforcement response was quick enough to prevent further casualties.
At the request of the mayor of Uvalde, the United States Department of Justice announced that it would conduct an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the shooting.

“The purpose of the review is to provide an independent account of law enforcement actions and responses that day, and to identify lessons learned and best practices to help first responders prepare. and to respond to active shooting events,” the DOJ said in a statement Sunday. .

Alfred Garcia, whose daughter was killed in the shooting, told CNN he was “in disbelief” at how long the shooting took before it ended and shared his frustration with the authorities’ response.

“It doesn’t take a genius to figure out that it took too long to get in there and, you know, if they had come sooner, and someone would have taken immediate action, we might have more of these children here today, including my daughter,” he said.

President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden traveled to Uvalde on Sunday to pay their respects, attend mass and lay flowers at a memorial for the victims. The pair also met privately with family members of the victims as well as first responders.

Funerals for the victims are scheduled to begin on Monday and Uvalde Funeral Homes have pledged to cover the costs for the families.

Law enforcement response questioned

The actions taken by first responders – or lack thereof – during filming have been at the center of those who say more should have been done sooner.

"We have problems".  80 minutes of horror at Robb Elementary School

Law enforcement officers in Texas are trained to respond quickly, according to active shooter guidelines in the state’s 2020 Law Enforcement Commission training manual obtained by CNN, which states that “the An officer’s first priority is to go in and confront the attacker”.

“As first responders, we must recognize that innocent life must be defended,” he says. “A first responder who does not want to put the lives of innocent people above their own safety should consider another career field.”

Seven officers arrived on the scene less than two minutes after the shooter fired into the classroom. Three officers approached the locked classroom where the shooter was, and two officers were grazed by bullets fired from behind the door, DPS said. Officers then moved to the hallway.

Border Patrol agents from a specialist unit arrived at the scene around 12:15 p.m., about 45 minutes after the shooter began shooting. The officer in charge had already determined that the subject was barricaded in the room, according to a source familiar with the situation.
Children are the pride and joy of Uvalde.  After the school shooting, the city is reeling from a mass tragedy

The team then did not enter the classroom for at least another 30 minutes, according to the schedule provided by DPS. Because Border Patrol often plays a supporting role, it will defer to the agency on command, the source said.

A 911 call made at 12:16 p.m., according to the DPS, from a girl in one of the classrooms where students were shot told the operator that eight or nine students were still alive.

When asked on Friday why officers hadn’t moved in sooner, Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steven McCraw said “it was believed at the time that the subject was immobile and barricaded. ‘, adding that they thought ‘there was no risk to other children’.

“Looking back from where I’m sitting right now – there were clearly kids in the room, they’re clearly at risk,” McCraw said. “There may be children who are injured, who may have been shot but injured and it is important, in order to save lives, to immediately go to the scene and provide assistance.”

A police officer cleans the makeshift memorial ahead of President Joe Biden's visit to Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on Sunday.

The community comes together

In the aftermath of the shooting, an outpouring of support for community members is provided.

Carlos Hernandez, whose restaurant is a mile from Robb Elementary, wrote on Facebook hours after the shooting, “There’s no way I’m going to open my kitchen with a broken heart and have fun doing it.”

On Thursday — his 33rd birthday — Hernandez decided to cook for the community, whipping up favorite dishes including wings, mac and cheese and fried fish tacos.

Within two hours, Hernandez had distributed more than 60 family-sized platters to feed grieving families and neighbors still learning to cope with the tragedy inflicted on their tight-knit community.

“It’s a really tough situation, I’m just trying to show the kids that they have us as a backbone and a support system,” Hernandez told CNN. “We always deliver whether there is an incident or no incident.”

Their mother was killed in Uvalde, then their father died of a heart attack - now people are giving millions for their families

Elsewhere in Uvalde, the El Progreso Memorial Library has become a place of healing.

On Wednesday, just a day after the shooting, children’s librarian Martha Carreon sat in front of rows of little faces, reading, singing and laughing with the children, taking them to a safe place away from school where many them became witnesses to the horror.

“We want our building to be a safe space, a refuge that is a haven of peace, calm and coolness,” Mendell Morgan, director of the El Progreso Memorial Library, told CNN.

In addition to psychologists who will be available every day of the week for children and adults to talk to, there will also be massage therapists, volunteers for arts and crafts activities, pianists to play soothing music and even magicians to organize professional magic shows.

“It’s a strong community where we really care about each other,” Morgan said. “Many, if not most here, cling to their faith believing in God, that good is stronger than evil and that light is stronger than darkness.”

CNN’s Alaa Elassar, Ed Lavandera, Amanda Watts, Hannah Sarisohn, Virginia Langmaid, Paula Reid, Priscilla Alvarez, Christina Maxouris, Holly Yan and Aya Elamroussi contributed to this report.

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