Room Services – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 18:26:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hotels-benin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Room Services – Hotels Benin http://hotels-benin.com/ 32 32 719 psychiatric patients are stuck in emergency rooms awaiting treatment, according to a report from Mass. https://hotels-benin.com/719-psychiatric-patients-are-stuck-in-emergency-rooms-awaiting-treatment-according-to-a-report-from-mass/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 18:05:10 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/719-psychiatric-patients-are-stuck-in-emergency-rooms-awaiting-treatment-according-to-a-report-from-mass/ The first of what will be weekly reports from Massachusetts hospitals shows 716 patients who need and cannot get acute psychiatric care. 174 children and 542 adults presented to the emergency room in distress and are still there because the treatment programs they need are comprehensive. “Behavioral health has become the epidemic within the pandemic,” […]]]>

The first of what will be weekly reports from Massachusetts hospitals shows 716 patients who need and cannot get acute psychiatric care. 174 children and 542 adults presented to the emergency room in distress and are still there because the treatment programs they need are comprehensive.

“Behavioral health has become the epidemic within the pandemic,” says Leigh Youmans, who leads work on this issue at the Massachusetts Health and Hospital Association (MHA). “We have seen significant amounts of behavioral health needs increase in all acute care hospitals across the state.”

(Graphic courtesy of the Massachusetts Health & Hospital Association)

The problem is worse in some areas and in some hospitals. At a peak in the past month, 49% of emergency room beds in southeastern Massachusetts were occupied by patients on a waiting list for psychiatric care, compared with 24% in western Massachusetts. The MHA says one hospital reported 87% of beds used for what’s called psychological boarding school last month.

Detaining patients in need of mental health care limits space for those presenting with chest pain, early signs of stroke, wounds and other common emergencies.

“This problem is one of the main problems our hospitals are currently facing,” says Youmans.

The mental health boarding school has increased wait times in emergency rooms. Staff say more and more people are giving up and leaving.

“This has caused us to have an extremely high number of ‘unseen leftovers’,” says Dr. Joe Tennyson, who runs the UMass Memorial emergency rooms in Leominster and Clinton, “because we can’t get patients back in. spaces to see them. “

Staff shortages are part of the embarkation problem. Patients can wait a day for a psychological assessment, which is usually the first step in determining what they need and which programs would be best for them.

Tennyson, who sits on the Massachusetts College of Emergency Physicians board of trustees, says he’s happy to have this statewide view, but that doesn’t tell the whole story. What’s missing is how long patients are stuck in the emergency room. Tennyson says one to two weeks is common. But he had an 18-year-old autistic boy who was interned for five months and has just found a placement. Tennyson says placement of children and adolescents is still particularly difficult.

“These are children who do not see the light of day,” he says. “Their movements and activities are restricted. Their educational efforts are limited to what we can safely provide. We are doing the people a terrible disservice.

(Graphic courtesy of the Massachusetts Health & Hospital Association)
(Graphic courtesy of the Massachusetts Health & Hospital Association)

Some patients say that boarding worsens their anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues. Lisa Lambert, executive director of the Parent / Professional Advocacy League, says adding data to the stories of patients languishing in emergency rooms will illustrate the extent of the problem and help push for needed change.

“We wouldn’t ask a heart patient or a cancer patient to sit in an emergency room and wait for days,” Lambert says.

One of the reasons for the difference is the money. Hospitals say they are losing money on mental health care. The Baker administration has increased psychiatric reimbursement for patients covered by MassHealth. That should help fund 300 new psychiatric beds this year and next – just enough to help half the children and adults get on board now.

But it’s not clear whether hospitals will be able to find the staff needed to open these beds. And there have been other setbacks. Cambridge Health Alliance had planned to add psychiatric beds to its Somerville hospital by the end of the year, but a water main rupture earlier this month is causing delays.

To reduce mental health internship, MHA recommends creating a trust fund to help increase staff, task force to review reimbursement rates, changes to reduce denial of coverage, insurance and rules that would facilitate the expansion of mental health services.

The Baker administration says it has a plan that includes provisions to both expand preventive mental health care and increase treatment in emergency care behavioral health clinics. These centers could handle some emergency needs to avoid overcrowding hospital emergency rooms.

The MHA says it is working closely with the state on solutions to this perennial problem. The Baker administration has yet to comment on the MHA report


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Guest Spot: I am very proud of my service to Southold https://hotels-benin.com/guest-spot-i-am-very-proud-of-my-service-to-southold/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 10:05:26 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/guest-spot-i-am-very-proud-of-my-service-to-southold/ Elizabeth Neville is sworn in for a fifth of six terms as clerk of Southold Town. (Credit: Carrie Miller) I would like to give an accurate account of how my office served the public during the COVID-19 pandemic as of March 17, 2020. The operations of my office have never been closed. As an elected […]]]>

I would like to give an accurate account of how my office served the public during the COVID-19 pandemic as of March 17, 2020. The operations of my office have never been closed. As an elected official, I was at my desk continually serving the public by phone, email, and through the back window of the office to the best of my ability. Under Governor Cuomo’s order, only two of my staff were allowed to work, only one at a time was allowed in the office with me, and one worked from home.

As many tasks as possible have been completed as usual. At the end of May 2020, two additional staff members were authorized to return to the office on a 50% alternation basis. From May 16, 2020 to October 15, 2020, my office began issuing drive-thru permits at the Town Hall Annex as well as at the Town Hall. The town hall has never been at a standstill.

As a city clerk for 24 years, I have worked tirelessly to bring technology not only to the city clerk’s office, but to all offices and departments across the city. In 1989, when the NYS Archives Local Government Records Management Grants Program was established, I began writing and submitting grant applications to the NYS Archives for funding. The first grants involved locating all city records in all city offices, inventorying and organizing them, and setting up on-site storage rooms in the basement.

This removed overflowing inactive records and allowed them to run more efficiently. The technology grants became available when I was elected city clerk in 1998. Some of the grants received were: Archive Writer Microfilming Machine; Laserfiche digital imaging system; large scale map scanner; book scanner for bound books; Municipal Land Management System (allowing ministries to manage the issuance of their permits); updating of the Cartographic Information System (GIS); RIO Laserfiche update (for digital forms and workflows).

In 1998, I initiated the city’s purchase of BAS Town Clerk Receipting Software (prior to that all receipts were handwritten). In 2003, I initiated the purchase by the city of the municipal clerk’s agenda / minutes / media traffic management systems. For the record, in 2018 I received the NYSED Archives Cheryl Steinbech Award for Excellence in Local Government Records Management. In 2009, the Suffolk Times ‘Public Service Person of the Year’ award and in 2008 the NYS Town Clerks Association ‘City Clerk of the Year’ award. All of the awards recognized many of my records management accomplishments.

I have never considered political party affiliation or given preferential treatment to a political party or to anyone in my office. I have always run my office in a strictly bipartisan fashion and have asked my staff to treat everyone equally. It has been an honor and pleasure to have served the people of the Town of Southold for the past fifty years (including twenty-four as City Clerk).

Ms Neville is the Clerk of Southold Town and is retiring after half a century of public service.


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Cribbage today | News, Sports, Jobs https://hotels-benin.com/cribbage-today-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 06:05:17 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/cribbage-today-news-sports-jobs/ Cribbage players will meet at 1:30 p.m. today at Ceylon’s Legends II and next Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at Welcome at Welcome Legion Hall. Join them for an afternoon of fun. On Sunday, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Wilbert will have services at 9:30 a.m. with communion and after services they will have their assembly […]]]>

Cribbage players will meet at 1:30 p.m. today at Ceylon’s Legends II and next Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at Welcome at Welcome Legion Hall. Join them for an afternoon of fun.

On Sunday, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Wilbert will have services at 9:30 a.m. with communion and after services they will have their assembly of electors. Members are invited to attend.

The Wilbert Ladies LWML group will be collecting non-perishable food and money for the Heaven’s Table pantry until November 21

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church has services at 8:30 am this Sunday and next Sunday, October 17th, their members can take a drive thru communion from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm at

Trinity Lutheran at Welcome or Waverly Lutheran north of Welcome. This fellowship is available for Circle of Faith parishes, which includes St. Peter Lutheran in Ceylon, Trinity at Welcome, Waverly at Welcome and First Lutheran at Trimont on the second and third Sunday.

The Legion and the Sons of the Legion in Ceylon will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday in the back room of Legends ll. All members are welcome to attend.

Ceylon city council will meet at 6 p.m. on Tuesday at town hall. There is always a time for comments / questions from the public at the start of each meeting. To be on the agenda, please contact the municipal worker prior to the meeting date at (507) 632-4653.

Tuesday coffee hours continue from 8:30 am to 10 am in October at St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Sherburn.

Thursday Coffee Lovers meets from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. in Ceylon in the back room of Legends ll. All residents of the area are invited to these coffee hours for good coffee and good fellowship.

On Monday there will be a Red Cross blood drive from 1 pm to 6 pm at St. John Vianney Church in Fairmont. On Wednesday there will be a blood drive from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Truman. On October 18, there will be a blood drive at Welcome from noon to 6 p.m. There will be a blood drive from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on November 1 at Northrop. On November 8, there will be a blood drive from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. in Sherburn. Now plan to give the gift of life, donate blood. Each donation can save the lives of up to three people. Call 1-800-red-cross (733-2767) or go online at www.redcrossblood.org or send BLOODAPP to 90999 for blood drive locations or to make an appointment.

The latest news today and more in your inbox


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OHIO Lancaster announces opening of Fairfield County Workforce Center with ribbon cutting https://hotels-benin.com/ohio-lancaster-announces-opening-of-fairfield-county-workforce-center-with-ribbon-cutting/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 14:23:24 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/ohio-lancaster-announces-opening-of-fairfield-county-workforce-center-with-ribbon-cutting/ The Fairfield County Workforce Center officially opened on September 22 with an open house and ribbon-cutting ceremony, bringing together participation from national and local leaders and key business partners. Jarrod Tudor, dean of campus and community relations at Ohio University Lancaster, believes the Fairfield County Workforce Center can be a role model for all other […]]]>

The Fairfield County Workforce Center officially opened on September 22 with an open house and ribbon-cutting ceremony, bringing together participation from national and local leaders and key business partners.

Jarrod Tudor, dean of campus and community relations at Ohio University Lancaster, believes the Fairfield County Workforce Center can be a role model for all other counties looking to grow their workforce and economic development.

“We’re interested in this because we know that starting college right out of high school isn’t necessarily for everyone,” Tudor said. “Through this partnership, we may also be able to attract students who don’t think about going to college right out of high school.

The Fairfield County Workforce Center, located at 4665 Coonpath Road, offers training programs for high-demand industries including manufacturing, skilled trades and healthcare. The Center is a collaborative partnership between Fairfield County Commissioners, Ohio University Lancaster, Russ College of Engineering and Technology, and Hocking College. The partnership focuses on economic development through training and workforce development.

“It could be a way to get people into our workforce immediately,” Tudor added. “And maybe you don’t get that four-year degree right away. It may take five years. It may take six years. But you’ve got a business backing you up, you’ve got six years of work experience, a degree from Hocking College, a degree from Ohio University Lancaster, and a hell of a resume. It could be a great way to get people interested in manufacturing, healthcare, etc.

The state of Ohio provided $ 1.25 million to help reuse the building that was previously used by the Fairfield County Board of Development Disabilities.

Commissioner Jeff Fix said the local Pickerington School District has started sending large numbers of students to the center and has encouraged other school districts to do the same.

“We need partnerships with the state government, our town of Lancaster, the city of Pickerington and the county government,” Fix said. “We’re all here to solve a problem of making sure there is a workforce for these companies that come here. Lancaster has done a great job recently bringing new business here, and it’s great. This will only last as long as we can continue to provide new employers with a skilled workforce.

Ohio Department of Employment and Family Director Matt Damschroder said a recent study by the National Association of State Workforce Agencies showed that 94% of apprentice interns remained employed after completing their program. .

“We will be making a long-term commitment to developing the workforce in our community for the purposes of economic development,” said Damschroder. “While you’re investing here in these kinds of programs, we’re investing in the state and revamping things like the Ohio Means Jobs website so that all of these different pieces come together for the respective employers and employees to really get along with. ensure that Ohio is a place where they can grow their business.

After the inauguration ceremony, the participants were able to visit the building. Mike Ulmer, director of workforce development and skills development at Ohio University, discussed the opportunities offered by the engineering technology program offered at the center. Ulmer also led the guests through the robotics room where new equipment was on display.

The Engineering Technology program prepares students to become electrical technicians, programmable logic controller technicians, and computer numerical control (CNC) and quality technicians.

Visit the center website to learn more about the programs offered at the Fairfield County Workforce Center. To learn more about the Ohio University Lancaster Engineering Technology program, visit engineering technology program page.


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Illinois toddler fights for life as COVID transmission rages https://hotels-benin.com/illinois-toddler-fights-for-life-as-covid-transmission-rages/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 12:38:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/illinois-toddler-fights-for-life-as-covid-transmission-rages/ October 6 (Reuters) – When her two-year-old started feeling sick early last week, Tiffany Jackson didn’t think it could be COVID-19. No one else in the family was sick. Adrian James just coughed a bit. She gave him cough syrup and put a humidifier in her room. But on Friday he was sweaty and his […]]]>

October 6 (Reuters) – When her two-year-old started feeling sick early last week, Tiffany Jackson didn’t think it could be COVID-19.

No one else in the family was sick. Adrian James just coughed a bit. She gave him cough syrup and put a humidifier in her room.

But on Friday he was sweaty and his breathing was difficult. Jackson took him to the emergency room in his small town of Mt. Vernon, Illinois. Doctors and nurses took a chest x-ray there and swabbed it for COVID – then airlifted the child to Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital in St. Louis, about 80 miles away.

Jackson was following in the car, his grandmother at the wheel. They made the trip usually 90 minutes in about an hour.

“I didn’t know if he would make it or not,” Jackson said. “I was very emotional and just very upset.”

Her boy is one of nearly 840,000 children under the age of four to contract COVID-19 in the United States, according to statistics from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). COVID-19 vaccines have not been approved for young children, and the United States is ravaged by a spate of cases caused by the highly contagious Delta variant, of which Adrian has.

Late Tuesday night, he was intubated and heavily sedated, wrapped in his baby blanket with his favorite Paw Patrol stuffed animal close at hand.

Over the past two days, his lungs have been able to do more work of breathing, and it is possible that he will be removed from the ventilator soon.

The United States passed the 700,000 death mark from COVID last week, and concern is growing over the number of infections in children.

Transmission of the virus remains high in all U.S. states except California, according to CDC data.

‘THIS IS SERIOUS’

Adrian, who will be three years old next month, had developed pneumonia in his left lung. He was breathing rapidly, trying to swallow air at 76 breaths per minute, nearly double the normal 40, Jackson said.

At the hospital, doctors and nurses wearing masks, face shields and gowns sedated him and put him on a breathing tube attached to a ventilator in the intensive care unit.

Jackson sleeps on a couch in his intensive care room.

Jackson doesn’t know how his boy got the virus. She had COVID last summer; no one else in the family caught it at that time.

Jackson is not vaccinated against COVID-19 because she suffers from a rare autoimmune disease called Guillain-Barre syndrome contracted from a flu shot when she was 16 years old. The syndrome, which is incurable, causes damage to the nervous system.

Adrian’s father, who is at home with their youngest child in Illinois, received one dose of the COVID vaccine but not the second dose, she said. Maybe, she thinks, someone at work passed it on to her, although everyone in the factory where he is employed is expected to wear masks and practice physical distancing.

Jackson, 21, is deeply grateful for the care her child received. She begins to believe that this will save her life.

And she hopes Adrian’s story will help people understand what it might mean to pass the virus on to young children and people with vulnerable immune systems.

“I just want people to realize this is serious,” she said.

Reporting by Sharon Bernstein in Sacramento, California. Additional reporting by Callaghan O’Hare in St. Louis. Editing by Donna Bryson, Robert Birsel

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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A month after Ida’s landing, the Louisianans denounce the conditions of the “third world” https://hotels-benin.com/a-month-after-idas-landing-the-louisianans-denounce-the-conditions-of-the-third-world/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:05:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/a-month-after-idas-landing-the-louisianans-denounce-the-conditions-of-the-third-world/ CROZIER, Louisiana, Oct. 5 (Reuters) – Bruce Westley stood outside his crumbling mobile home, gesturing to a small lime-green tent, two patio chairs and a 30-quart aluminum pot atop a single propane burner . “For over a month this has been our bedroom, living room and kitchen,” said the disabled Navy veteran, 65. He and […]]]>

CROZIER, Louisiana, Oct. 5 (Reuters) – Bruce Westley stood outside his crumbling mobile home, gesturing to a small lime-green tent, two patio chairs and a 30-quart aluminum pot atop a single propane burner .

“For over a month this has been our bedroom, living room and kitchen,” said the disabled Navy veteran, 65. He and his wife Christina are among thousands of struggling Southeast Louisians more than a month after Hurricane Ida swept through the heart of Cajun country.

Reuters has scoured the bayous of the hard-hit parishes of Terrebonne, Lafourche, Jefferson and Plaquemines in recent days, speaking to more than 40 residents. All said they felt abandoned by state and federal authorities. A few said they had not received any kind of support from any level of government.

“We can’t go on living like this,” Westley said. “We just need anything to get off the ground, man.”

In most areas, it looked like Ida had crossed over only a day or two ago. Elders who say they’ve seen it all swear they’ve never witnessed a more destructive storm.

A spokesperson for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said the agency was working as quickly as possible. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards on Monday announced a FEMA-backed temporary accommodation program that he said would begin bringing trailers to the hardest hit areas to ease the housing shortage.

Human misery and piles of debris testify to the massive pressure on public and private resources in a hurricane-prone area. The scenes also raise questions about how the United States will cope as climate change creates a new, more destructive normal.

Reuters did not see any heavy equipment, trucks or workers helping people clear rubble and recover their belongings. The only government presence was in the form of law enforcement officers and FEMA mobile center staff dealing with disaster claims. Residents said this has been essentially so since Ida made landfall on August 29 and killed 26 people, although roads in the area have been largely cleared of debris.

Hundreds of people, many of them elderly and children, were in tents. Others were in homes that clearly had severe structural damage and where mold, which can impact respiratory health and cause severe allergic reactions, was spreading.

Grocery stores, most restaurants and other businesses remain closed. Electricity is still cut for thousands of people and many do not have water or sewer services.

Despite the difficulties, the communities are trying to come together. Outside Howard Third Zion Travelers Baptist Church, just two blocks from where Westley and his wife are camping, volunteers say they have distributed meals to 1,000 families a day. Ida destroyed the south wall of the church.

“Do you want to know what happened to help these people? Virtually nothing,” said Talisa Clark, a historically black zone community activist who helped coordinate the food distribution. “There are no state or federal boots on the ground to help. It sounds like a third world country’s efforts here.”

Clark was forced to leave her badly damaged home near Houma and stayed with relatives.

Parish authorities in Terrebonne, Lafourche, Jefferson and Plaquemines did not respond to a request for comment.

DIFFICULT CHOICES

John Mills, spokesperson for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) at a support site in Golden Meadow, Louisiana, said he understood the frustrations of those who survived Ida.

“Families and communities will face tough choices about how to rebuild – and whether to rebuild here at all,” he said.

FEMA distributes money so that people can rent housing for at least two months. In addition, on Monday, FEMA said it was paying hotel costs to nearly 8,000 families. In total, he estimates he spent at least $ 30 million on hotel costs.

“This plan probably works in most circumstances. But the extent of Ida’s damage is so enormous that there is no housing stock, there are no available hotel rooms,” said Tanner Magee, a representative of the state whose district includes the parish of Terrebonne.

State and parish governments have contracted out the task of picking up the debris, but have even struggled to decide where to drop it, Magee said. He said many more workers and trucks were needed in the hard-hit areas.

Magee and her family, who live in Houma, stay in her house damaged by Ida.

“If you constantly see this destruction around you and it’s not going anywhere, it hits people,” Magee said. “I am really worried about people’s mental health.”

Magee and others say they need FEMA temporary trailers. FEMA says it takes several weeks and is complicated by federal and state regulations that make it difficult to install temporary shelters during hurricane season.

FEMA, along with the Small Business Administration, has so far paid more than $ 1.1 billion for damages caused by Ida, mostly through homeowner grants, as well as the National Flood Insurance Program. from FEMA. Estimates of uninsured damage stand at more than $ 19 billion, according to real estate data and analysis firm CoreLogic, with 90% of those losses along the Louisiana coast and the rest in Alabama and the United States. Mississippi. There could be another $ 21 billion in damage to insured properties.

STAY HERE

In Galliano, Maria Molina hand washed shirts and shorts for her 7-year-old daughter Julia and adult son Leonardo; she then hung them up to dry.

“I have no more work, I have no more money and we have no more food. We have nowhere to go, even though this caravan seems dangerous,” she told About his blue mobile home, which was now akilter with a damaged roof and foundation.

Molina was waiting to see if she would qualify for FEMA assistance.

Down the street in the town of Golden Meadow, Rosie Verdin, 73, stood on the sloping porch of her home behind the tribal headquarters of her United Houma Nation.

Verdin said Ida’s destruction was the worst she had seen. Three quarters of his tribe’s 19,000 members have seen their homes destroyed or left uninhabitable.

“But nothing will drive us out of this land,” she said. “With or without help, we will rebuild and stay here.”

Reporting by Brad Brooks; Editing by Donna Bryson and Aurora Ellis

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Ang Mo Kio Community Care Center ‘Bare and Dirty Rooms’ Were Solved Weeks Ago: MOH and MOM, Singapore News https://hotels-benin.com/ang-mo-kio-community-care-center-bare-and-dirty-rooms-were-solved-weeks-ago-moh-and-mom-singapore-news/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 05:45:00 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/ang-mo-kio-community-care-center-bare-and-dirty-rooms-were-solved-weeks-ago-moh-and-mom-singapore-news/ A Facebook post published on Saturday October 2 highlighted the living conditions – with “bare and dirty” rooms – of a community care facility on the former site of the Institute for Technical Education (ITE) in Ang Mo Kio. The Ministry of Health (MOH) and the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) said in a joint media […]]]>

A Facebook post published on Saturday October 2 highlighted the living conditions – with “bare and dirty” rooms – of a community care facility on the former site of the Institute for Technical Education (ITE) in Ang Mo Kio.

The Ministry of Health (MOH) and the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) said in a joint media response that they inspected and fixed this problem “several weeks ago”, but that ‘they would continue to work with the management officer of the establishment to “continually improve living conditions”.

The detailed post from Facebook user Min Chan, who gathered more than 200 shares, included four videos that revealed “dire conditions” for those who test positive for Covid-19 and live in this quarantine facility.

https://www.facebook.com/101330/posts/1010601800245912/

She shared that her friend, who has lived and worked in Singapore for over eight years on a work permit, caught Covid-19 from her Singaporean owner. Although he was fully vaccinated with mild symptoms, he was ordered to be quarantined at the facility.

Upon arrival, the friend was greeted with hair on his bed and used headphones in his bedroom. Personal tables, chairs and lamps were not provided, the post added.

In the video, the dorms can be seen without doors, meaning that during a thunderstorm, rain can easily enter the room, she said – leaving occupants to shake without blankets provided.

“He hasn’t met a single Singaporean or PE holder at the ITE facility,” said Min Chan, “his roommates are all from India or China, with work permits.”

Response from MOH and MOM

In a recent inspection of the facility, the two ministries, in a joint media response, said rooms were generally clean and basic amenities such as clean sheets and blankets were provided to each isolated occupant. .

The departments added, “The ground operations team is looking at some of the issues and has taken immediate action to resolve them.

These include improving infrastructure to prevent splashing rainwater during heavy downpours, purchasing more fans, and installing more container toilets. “

On October 2, MOM said Covid-19 measures would be changed for migrant workers living in dormitories, focusing on those with symptoms and in need of medical attention.

Other changes include using more Covid-19 tests that are faster and less intrusive, better contact tracing, and allowing Covid-19 positive workers – those vaccinated and asymptomatic – to recover in their dormitory facilities.

According to MOM, these new measures follow existing guidelines from the Ministry of Health for the public and also aim to reduce disruption to the work and lives of migrant workers.

ALSO READ: Tested positive for Covid-19? Here’s where you should go for help and what kind of treatment you would need

amierul@asiaone.com


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In Alaska’s Covid Crisis, Doctors Must Decide Who Lives and Who Dies https://hotels-benin.com/in-alaskas-covid-crisis-doctors-must-decide-who-lives-and-who-dies/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 16:30:39 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/in-alaskas-covid-crisis-doctors-must-decide-who-lives-and-who-dies/ “Our goal has always been to prevent systems from being overwhelmed,” said Dr Zink. “And right now we have overwhelmed systems.” Gov. Dunleavy avoided ordering a statewide mask warrant or other restrictions in the latest wave, saying those demands should be decided locally in a large state where some communities have had little or no […]]]>

“Our goal has always been to prevent systems from being overwhelmed,” said Dr Zink. “And right now we have overwhelmed systems.”

Gov. Dunleavy avoided ordering a statewide mask warrant or other restrictions in the latest wave, saying those demands should be decided locally in a large state where some communities have had little or no no case. A statewide mask mandate project had been developed at the start of the pandemic, Dr Zink said, but it was never implemented.

With every Covid-19 patient, Dr Zink said, she wonders if she could have done more, something she could have said, to convince more people to get vaccinated or take precautions.

She became a household name early in the pandemic, when she gave video briefings to the public from a heated yurt behind her family’s home. In many parts of the state, she has received wide acclaim. One recent day, while talking with a reporter in an Anchorage park, a couple walking their dog recognized Dr Zink and waved to him. “We’re fans,” the man shouted.

But Dr. Zink spends time trying to reach people who aren’t fans. She appeared on conservative talk radio, answering questions and trying to allay fears about vaccines.

Although some people have made up their minds, Dr Zink said, she still regularly finds others making the decision to get the vaccine. A state investigation, she said, found that 60% of unvaccinated people are open to it. When trying to encourage people to consider vaccines, she often uses references to moose hunting and berry hunting and all the ways Alaskans are used to taking care of themselves.

“Just like when we go out in a storm, we overlap,” she said.

“We do several things together: we change our snow tires and we wear a jacket and we wear a hat,” she said. “So make sure you get vaccinated, wear a mask and keep your distance. We know how to do this.


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Police services relocated to St Stanislas College – Guyana press room https://hotels-benin.com/police-services-relocated-to-st-stanislas-college-guyana-press-room/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 23:05:55 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/police-services-relocated-to-st-stanislas-college-guyana-press-room/ Following the massive fire that destroyed more than 80% of Brickdam Police Station on Saturday, some services were temporarily relocated to St Stanislaus College. Guyanese police said in a statement that police offices and outposts to deal with reports and other police-related matters have been established at the school. The 911 number is now also […]]]>

Following the massive fire that destroyed more than 80% of Brickdam Police Station on Saturday, some services were temporarily relocated to St Stanislaus College.

Guyanese police said in a statement that police offices and outposts to deal with reports and other police-related matters have been established at the school.

The 911 number is now also usable. Before the fire, the operations room of the Brickdam police station managed this number as well as the numbers 227-1611, 227-1149, 227-1270, 225-6940-3.

“While investigations into the fire are ongoing, police operational activities in the division continue unabated and efforts are being made to relocate the affected offices and ranks,” the police headquarters said.

The aftermath of the fire (Photo: Richard Bhainie)

The fire broke out around 11:06 a.m. and devastated wooden buildings despite efforts by Guyana firefighters to contain it. The newsroom understands that some of the structures were over 100 years old.

The Guyana Fire Department was supported by four water supplies from the Central Station, as well as five more from the Alberttown, West Ruimveldt, Diamond, Campbellville and Melanie fire stations.

By the time the fire was brought under control, the majority of the buildings were already destroyed. The station blockades, barracks and impact base were the only buildings left standing after the massive fire.

A few police vehicles and a number of private vehicles detained in connection with investigations were also destroyed.

Police forces said that although all prisoners had been relocated to safety, a few members of the police sustained minor injuries as they attempted to retain files, equipment, furniture, weapons and ammunition. important.

A commercial space behind the station was also damaged by the fire.

In the meantime, engineers will immediately review plans to rebuild the station, Home Secretary Robeson Benn revealed in a briefing on Saturday.

The cause of the fire is not yet known as firefighters are continuing their investigations.


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Gena Cooper: Save time and money knowing if you need to go to the emergency room or the emergency room https://hotels-benin.com/gena-cooper-save-time-and-money-knowing-if-you-need-to-go-to-the-emergency-room-or-the-emergency-room/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 04:28:19 +0000 https://hotels-benin.com/gena-cooper-save-time-and-money-knowing-if-you-need-to-go-to-the-emergency-room-or-the-emergency-room/ It’s scary enough to be sick or injured enough to need medical attention – and the uncertainty of where to go can add to an already stressful situation. But how do you know where are you going? Almost 82% of hospital emergency room visits could be handled by an emergency care facility. Emergency Treatment Centers […]]]>

It’s scary enough to be sick or injured enough to need medical attention – and the uncertainty of where to go can add to an already stressful situation. But how do you know where are you going?

Almost 82% of hospital emergency room visits could be handled by an emergency care facility. Emergency Treatment Centers (UTC) are walk-in clinics that are either affiliated with a hospital network or run by private companies. You can go to an emergency treatment center if you cannot enter with your attending physician or if you need to be seen by a provider after hours. Unlike emergency departments, the wait time can be shorter and the cost of treatment is much lower.

(Photo by Halfpoint; iStock / Getty Images Plus, via UK Healthcare)

Go to emergency care for non-life-threatening conditions such as:

• Fever or flu
• Eye and ear disorders
• Sprains and strains
• Cuts that may require stitches
• Urinary tract infections
• Fractures and minor fractures, such as toes or fingers

Emergency treatment centers may also provide imaging and laboratory tests if ordered by your primary care provider, as well as flu shots and other routine vaccinations and physical exams required by patients. schools, sports or camps.

Go to a hospital emergency department for serious illness or injury, which may include:

• Serious injuries and trauma
• Chest pain
• Severe respiratory distress
• Head injuries
• Stroke
• Seizures
• broken bones
• Severe burns
• Severe pain

Emergency care centers and emergency departments accept most major insurance plans, but the emergency care co-pay can be much lower. The average cost of treating a UTI in a CTU is $ 112, compared to $ 655 in an emergency department.

If you need a COVID-19 test, find a local testing site near you. Emergency departments cannot accept testing from those who have no symptoms or have mild symptoms.

Gena Cooper, MD, is the medical director of pediatric emergency medicine and the University of Kentucky Medical Center


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