MTA now provides buses to transport migrants arriving in New York to shelters

MTA buses are now circulating around newly arrived migrants — most from Texas — to various shelters and hotels in the five boroughs, The Post has learned.

Several groups of cross-border migrants were first dropped off by private coaches at the Manhattan Port Authority on Sunday before boarding city buses and heading to their new accommodations.

A source said municipal buses will normally make several stops throughout the city to drop off migrants.

An MTA bus dropped off all of its passengers at the HRA Men’s Shelter on Murray Hill in Manhattan on Sunday afternoon.

“We are providing two buses a day at the request of the city,” MTA Rep. Aaron Donovan said in a statement to The Post. “The destinations of the buses are determined by the city. The city agreed to pay the full cost of the bus service.

The cost of the arrangement was not immediately disclosed.

Several migrants could be seen on their smart phones after boarding city buses on Sunday, some waving and giving a reporter a thumbs up.

A group of migrants board a bus at the 42nd Street Bus Terminal in Manhattan on their way to a shelter on September 11, 2022.
GNMiller/NYPost
A migrant giving a thumbs up before boarding an MTA bus.
A migrant giving a thumbs up before boarding an MTA bus.
GNMiller/NYPost

Until now, migrants were normally placed in taxis to reach their shelters with the help of facilitators.

An estimated 8,000 migrants – the vast majority from the Lone Star State – have arrived in the city in recent months.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott redirected them from his field to New York to protest what he called the Biden administration’s failure to shore up the southern border.

The MTA provided two buses a day to be used for transporting migrants, according to MTA Representative Aaron Donovan.
The MTA provided two buses a day to be used for transporting migrants, according to MTA Representative Aaron Donovan.
GNMiller/NYPost

Texas absorbed an unfair share of the influx, Abbott says.

New York’s “right to shelter” policy prevents it from denying beds to those who need a place in a homeless shelter or hotel.

Comments are closed.